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HSE Supervisor Vacancy Jamnagar IDIP OSH| NEBOSH IGC| HSW| IOSH| ISO 45001| IADC| MEDIC FIRST AID| H2S| EMS @ ASHEI KOCHI Contact:9745126655,9447609617
HSE Supervisor Vacancy Jamnagar

Safety supervisor requirements in Reliance Jamnagar Gujarat under contractor.

HSE Supervisor Vacancy Jamnagar

As Received on 12th February 2019

HSE Supervisor Vacancy Jamnagar

Experience required- 2 to 3 years mechanical field such as pipeline , fabrication, structure erection .

Qualification one year full time safety diploma for HSE Supervisor Vacancy

Salary range 15000 to 18000. Service charge applicable .

Contact 7567703797

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HSE Manager Combo at ASHEI 9447609617
HSE MANAGER COMBO at ASHEI

HSE  MANAGER  PACKAGE @ ASHEI KOCHI

International Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health

HSE MANAGER COMBO: IDIP + ISO 45001 @ 145000/-

British Safety Council have been a trusted leader in health, safety and environmental management. They have educated millions of workers and made hundreds of thousands of workplaces healthier and safer for everyone. British Safety Council do this by sharing information, supporting organisations as they change, advising, educating and campaigning for effective legislation.

British Safety Council has changed the world of work for the better and we’ll never stop, because excellent health, safety and environmental management is good for your people and good for your business.

The International Diploma focuses on embedding health and safety into an organisation’s culture and highlights the key role of communication in securing senior management commitment.

This Course is Suitable For?

Health and safety professionals who are wanting to advance their professional career or undertake further postgraduate study.

Is This Qualification Recognised?

This qualification is also accepted by the International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (www.iirsm.org) as meeting their requirements for full membership (MIIRSM). United Kingdom professional health and safety bodies have a growing international reputation with a number of international branches being formed.
Meets the academic requirement for graduate membership of IOSH (Grad IOSH). Following the successful completion of a period of initial professional development, a graduate member may apply for chartered status (CMIOSH).

Benefits of the Course.

On successful completion of the qualification, the Diploma holder may apply for Graduate member (Grad IOSH) of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), the major UK professional body in the field (www.iosh.co.uk). This is the first step to becoming a Chartered Safety and Health Practitioner as a Chartered Member of IOSH (CMIOSH).
Holders of the British Safety Council International Diploma in Occupational Health and Safety may use the designatory letters “IDipOSH” after their name. The British Safety Council International Diploma is a prestigious and demanding professional qualification for those wanting to advance their career in occupational health and safety.IDipOSH is recognised around the world as the global standard for health and safety professionals. It aims to provide the knowledge and understanding that strengthen performance of a Health and Safety Professional.

Entry Requirement

There are no specific entry requirements for this qualification, however, it is highly recommended to complete NEBOSH International General Certificate or equivalent to Level 3 before undertaking the NEBOSH International Diploma. Fresher’s – Core Engineering graduates, Science graduates & polytechnic diploma holders with NEBOSH General Certificate or equivalent to Level 3.Good standard of written English communication is required since the examinations are held in English.

Course Content

The International Diploma is divided into Three units, each of which is assessed separately:
1: Principles of health and safety Management.
2: Safeguarding People’s Health in the Workplace.
3: Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture in the Workplace.

Exam

The International Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health exam is assessed in Three units:
The Unit 1: Principles Health and Safety Management – 3 Hrs written exam.
• .The Unit 2: Safeguarding People’s Health in the Workplace – 2.5 Hrs written exam and 5000 words assignment.
• The Unit 3: Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture in the Workplace – 10,000 words Assignment only.
• All the Candidate scripts are marked by external examiners appointed by British Safety Council.

Certification

Successfully completing the International Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health leads to Graduate Membership of IOSH. This is the first step to becoming a Chartered Health and Safety Practitioner as a Chartered Member of IOSH (CMIOSH)

Results and certificates issued within 30 working days.
Registration going on……………….. Total fees becomes 135000/-

ISO 45001 : 2018 LEAD AUDITOR TRAINING

IRCA APPROVED TVE CERTIFICATION……

Why CQI & IRCA?

CQI & IRCA is the leading professional body for management system auditors and offers a globally recognized business qualification. CQI & IRCA represents over 10,000 registered auditors in 150 countries and every year, around 60,000 delegates attend CQI & IRCA certified training course.

CQI & IRCA Certified courses are recognized as an industry leader and CQI & IRCA endorsement means that you can be confident that the course you are attending:

  • Covers the key knowledge and skills you need to start your journey as a management systems auditor
  • Will be taught by tutors who are experienced auditors and trainers who have fulfilled CQI & IRCA tutor competency requirements
  • Will be taught using a variety of proven practical student- focused learning techniques to help you learn and enjoy the course
  • Has a limited class size to maximize participation and Optimize your learning
  • Has been regularly assessed by an CQI & IRCA approved technical assessor.

Completion of this course is the first step to becoming CQI & IRCA registered, to find out more please visit www.irca.org/join

CQI & IRCA recognize that attending a training course is usually a major commitment, both in terms of cost and time. When choosing the right training organizations and the right course, make sure you look for those that display the CQI & IRCA certification mark.

CQI & IRCA only approves organizations that have demonstrated a high standard of technical and training expertise. All training organizations approved by CQI & IRCA must demonstrate that they have the competence to achieve the learning outcomes for each course and to examine the performance of students.

When you are choosing CQI & IRCA certified Course and Training Organization you can be certain that;

Your knowledge and skills are developed by  interactive and practical approach to tasks and audit activities.
Courses is delivered by tutors who are experts in management systems in auditing and experienced in training.
Students are formally assessed and examined during training.

Who will benefit?

1. Management Representatives, OHSMS/Safety Consultants.
2. ISO / TQM consultants, Health and Safety consultants
3. Fire& Safety officers.
4. Personnel from Institutions / Companies aiming for and working towards Safety Certification
5. Students / Job Seekers in Safety field / Career development.

CQI and IRCA OHSMS Auditor training courses will equip you to assess the conformance of occupational health and safety management systems to OHSAS 18001.

This course covers the management systems approach to identifying and managing health and safety risks, the requirements of OHSAS 18001 and how to plan, complete and report the audit of an entire OHSMS.

Who is it for?

This course is for those intending to acquire the competence to audit an organisation’s OHSMS 18001 based management system, either as a third or second-party auditor. Successful completion of this course meets the requirement for certification as an Auditor on IRCA’s OHSMS scheme.

Course Period : 5 consecutive Days  Start Time 09:00; Finish Time 18:00
 Exam There is a 2 hours Close book exam on the final day (pass mark 70%)

TOTAL FEES IS 25000/- Exciting Packages Avilable………….

REGISTRATION GOING ON FOR NEXT BATCHES. HSE MANAGER COMBO:
FEW SEATS AVAILABLE. LAST DAYS…………………….. ……….
BSC LEVEL 6 & 3 | NEBOSH | IOSH | IADC RIGPASS | OSH DIPLOMA | MFA | ISO 45001 etc…
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|BSC|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590 Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 94 476096 17
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com
mail: info.ashei@gmail.com , a shei.neena@gmail.com
Slogan of the Month
A Great Practice is To Concentrate on the task(s) at hand

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Safety Officer

Safety Officer Machinery & Systems 

 Machinery & Systems Safety Officer

In order to be skilled get qualified at Ashei and employed abroad. Present vacancies for those who have experience of… Machinery & Systems Safety Officer

  • ISO Management Systems & associated processes
  • Machinery and Systems Safety Risk Assessments
  • Asset Management including identification, monitoring, auctioning marking assets
  • Collating technical files, health and safety files
  • CE Marking through self-certification
  • Managing identified actions to completion through research and problem solving
  • The design of machines to help ensure they are inherently safe from the get go
  • Drive new policies and procedures throughout the company, e.g. changes to CAPEX & selling of machinery
  • Develop and deliver effective training on relevant topics

Demonstrate knowledge of…

  • Relevant Directives, including Machinery Directive, Low Voltage Directive, EMC, Pressure Equipment, Reach, RoHS, ATEX, WEEE…
  • Requirements as per relevant harmonised standards
  • Relevant UK pieces of legislation, incl. PUWER, LOLER and associated ACOPs
  • The application of above in the automotive & racing industry
  • Automation Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering as applicable

Hold these qualifications…

  • Educated to Graduate Level in a technical discipline
  • Certified Machinery Safety Expert or similar
  • Internal Auditor

Be…

  • Solution focused & business enabling
  • Experience in a fast paced environment is a must
  • Able to effectively engage stakeholders at all levels
  • Excellent organisation & planning skills
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite

To apply please refer following link.

https://careers.pageuppeople.com/920/cw/en/job/493567/machinery-systems-safety-officer

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international safety courses in kerala
Bio-Safety Specialist at Qatar

Bio-Safety Specialist at Qatar

Urgent Vacancy at Biomedical Research Center!

As received on 15th October 2018.

Post:

Bio-Safety Specialist

Location: Qatar

ONLY WITH GENUINE QUALIFICATION AND EXPERIENCE NEED TO APPLY
 

Bio-Safety Specialist Qualications:

  • Firstly Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology or Bio medical Sciences. Further more at least 3 years of laboratory experience directly related to the duties and responsibilities specified. Also Safety qualifications also prefered
  • Also  Master’s degree in bio medical sciences may be substituted for up to 2 years of laboratory experience.
  • lastly Proficiency in Arabic and English, both written and verbal.
Provides professional assistance in monitoring and coordinating campus-wide biosafety program. Another to include risk-based laboratory inspections, accident investigations, in addition to record keeping. Assesses University facilities to determine suitability for use in potentially hazardous biomedical research operations, and advises professional and technical staff regarding biosafety practices, procedures, and regulatory requirements.
Qualified and interested candidates can send cv to hr@asheinstitute.com
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BSC International Diploma in kochi Reg open for next batch Call 9447609617 8606108000
BSC Idip at Kochi Get upgraded to Grad IOSH

BSC Idip at Kochi Get upgraded to Grad IOSH

BSC Idip at Kochi Get upgrade to Grad IOSH

International Diploma : Course dates for BSC Idip at Kochi on April 8&9 Exam.  Certainly a must for HSE professional. And those who are looking to upgrade their professional status.In addition to the course. ISO 45001 Lead and ISO 14001 Lead registration commenced. To enroll call us on 8606108000 or mail info@asheinstitute.com. in order to register call us

www.asheinstitute.com

 

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Nebosh course in kochi
Coming Home after a Flood!

Coming Home after a Flood, Returning Home After Flood.

Going back home after a flood can be dangerous if precautions are not been taken

Coming Home after a Flood, The floodwaters are receding in Kerala as the week-long heavy rains are waning. Yet, for those planning to return home, it is advisable to ensure that there won’t be another round of deluge soon. Some tips are:

  • Don’t be alone when you return home. Take with you a couple of people, who can be of (mutual) help when there is a sudden emergency…
  • Never take children with you; the accompanists should be adults…
  • Don’t return to home at night. Go when it’s daytime, so that you can see everything around
  • Must expect reptiles inside the house and outside…
  • There can perhaps be a cooking-gas leak from the kitchen. So never use light fire — be it to use a candle or smoke a cigarette
  • Those having concrete fence around their house should take care while opening the gate. Everything is soaked in water, and hence even cement structures can collapse.
  • Take care not to slip on the watery earth. Carry with you a towel to be tied around nose and mouth; better if you have a mask. Thick gloves also help.
  • Don’t touch with bare hands a dead body — be it of a human being or animal.

  • Mark with acrylic or chalk on the wall the level till which water has risen in the house. Such an exercise would be helpful in a study on futuristic studies on the risk of living in riverine belts and low-lying areas. In 1924, when the region last had its flood of similar intensity. No such effort was made, thus leaving several regions of Kerala clueless about liveability in the in the time of a deluge
  • Switch of the main electricity board before you enter the house. Also ensure that LPG cylinders are switched off.
  • Wooden doors would have bloated in the floods; so it would be tough to pull or push them while trying to open. Don’t apply too much force in one go, because the drenched walls too would not be in the best of shape.
  • Be inside house only after opening windows and letting fresh air come in.
  • If you sense any kind of unnatural or foul smell, don’t stay inside for long
  • Don’t open refrigerators carelessly. The rotten food, especial non-vegetarian, would have produced dangerous gases like methane that can exit with force.
  • Make an estimate of the financial loss of every object inside, click their pictures
  • Open taps and flushes to see if it is mud water or fresh water coming out
  • Whenever there is sunlight, let the windows remain open for fresh air to circulate the inside of the house.
  • Gather a definite idea with the rest in the locality on where to dump things that have gone into disuse owing to the flood. The decayed stuff should not just to be casually thrown somewhere.

Cleaning up and repairing:

  • Get help

  • Disinfection protection.

    Once floodwaters have receded, carefully clean and disinfect each wet item to protect your home and family from sewage or chemical contaminants. Be certain to wear protective clothing, including rubber gloves and boots, during cleanup activities.

  • Floods and food.

    Any items that have come in contact with floodwater should be thrown out. This includes bottled water, canned goods, plastic utensils, baby bottles, and more. When in doubt, throw it out!

  • Scammers and con artists.

    Hire only professional, reputable contractors for cleanup and repair needs. Avoid the “drive-by” contractor.

  • Safe drainage.

    Should your basement become flooded, drain it gradually – about 1/3 per day – to prevent structurally damage and collapse that may result from rapid water removal.

  • Insurance claims.

    Contact your insurance agents to discuss flash flood recovery claims.

  • Need help?

    Stay tuned to your TV or radio during flash flood recovery for information on assistance available in your area through government or other organizations.

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Safety Supervisor Job vacancy at KSA

Safety Supervisor Job vacancy at KSA

In order to get Safety Supervisor Job vacancy at KSA one must have the following qualification.

Require one safety supervisor for a company at Saudi.

Qualification requirements. The candidate should be IGC qualified and ISO 45001 qualification is an added advantage.

Firstly, the candidate should have more than 5 year experience. Most importantly the candidate should be able to manage big project

Immediate mobilization, certainly candidates are expected to move with in a month

Salary 8500 SR Plus benefits as per contract, seems to have upgrade of salary as per experience and qualification

Interested candidates to send cv to hr@asheinstitute.com

BSC IDIP @ ASHEI Kochi to register call: 9447609617, 8606108000

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Office safety -Ergonomics

Office safety . Safety training at kochi

Sitting Wrong At Your Workplace Your Entire Life…

If this is the posture  you maintain at work, read below

Are you sitting correct?

common reason for you suffer from the pain.

Usual mistakes at office

That back pain keeps you off job whol day.

What can go wrong due to wrong posture for log

Because of that it reduces your performance at work. what is the solution now?

sit upright. Hunchin back, slouching forward, and upright position strain your back all the same.

The best position to sit in is this.

Sitting posture. Office

Sitting at an angle of 100-135 degrees of your back to your legs is the ideal position. You are relaxed this way, and your muscles aren’t stressed in any way.

Check this out attentively.

OffIce safety how to sit correctly

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Safety equipment for employers

TYPES OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) TO GUARANTEE YOUR SAFETY

As an employer, you are in charge of a safe and healthy working environment for your employees. You are familiar with the safety risks within your sector, as well as the measures you can take to counteract these risks.

WHAT IS PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)?

PPE means personal protective equipment or equipment you use to guarantee your (own) safety.

Use PPE always and anywhere where necessary. Observe the instructions for use, maintain them well and check regularly if they still offer sufficient protection. But when do you use what type of protection?

These 7 tips will help you on your way.

1. SAFETY FOR THE HEAD

safetyWearing a helmet offers protection and can prevent head injuries. Select a sturdy helmet that is adapted to the working conditions. These days you can find many elegant designs and you can choose extra options such as an adjustable interior harness and comfortable sweatbands.

2. PROTECT YOUR EYES

protect eyesThe eyes are the most complex and fragile parts of our body. Each day, more than 600 people worldwide sustain eye injuries during their work. Thanks to a good pair of safety glasses, these injuries could be prevented. Do you come into contact with bright light or infrared radiation? Then welding goggles or a shield offer the ideal protection!

3. HEARING PROTECTION

hearingAre you working in an environment with high sound levels? In that case it is very important to consider hearing protection. Earplugs are very comfortable, but earmuffs are convenient on the work floor as you can quickly put these on or take them off.

4. MAINTAIN A GOOD RESPIRATION

respirationWearing a mask at work is no luxury, definitely not when coming into contact with hazardous materials. 15% of the employees within the EU inhale vapours, smoke, powder or dusk while performing their job. Dust masks offer protection against fine dust and other dangerous particles. If the materials are truly toxic, use a full-face mask. This adheres tightly to the face, to protect the nose and mouth against harmful pollution.

5. PROTECT YOUR HANDS WITH THE RIGHT GLOVES

protectionHands and fingers are often injured, so it is vital to protect them properly. Depending on the sector you work in, you can choose from gloves for different applications (Protection):

  • protection against vibrations
  • against cuts by sharp materials
  • from cold or heat
  • bacteriological risks
  • splashes from diluted chemicals.

6. PROTECTION FOR THE FEET

feet protectionEven your feet need solid protection. Safety shoes (type Sb, S1, S2 or S3) and boots (type S4 or S5) are the ideal solution to protect the feet against heavy weights. An antiskid sole is useful when working in a damp environment, definitely if you know that 16,2% of all industrial accidents are caused by tripping or sliding. On slippery surfaces, such as snow and ice, shoe claws are recommended. Special socks can provide extra comfort.

7. WEAR THE CORRECT WORK CLOTHING

work clothingPreventing accidents is crucial in a crowded workshop. That is why a good visibility at work is a must: a high-visibility jacket and pants made of a strong fabric can help prevent accidents. Just like the hand protection, there are versions for different applications.

WORST-CASE SCENARIO

Prevention is better than cure. A smart thing is to be prepared for the worst. A classic first-aid kit is no luxury but a first-aid kit for the eyes can also be an essential first aid. If the employee comes into contact with chemicals, a safety shower is mandatory, so that he can rinse the substances off his body at any moment.

pictograms

PREVENTING ACCIDENTS: PICTOGRAMS

Not only is preparing your workshop for accidents a smart thing to do, it is even smarter to organise your workshop in such a way that no serious accidents can take place. A simple way to make your workshop safer is to use pictograms: indicating flammable materials, the necessary use of hearing protection, indicating emergency exits …

You can find all pictograms in the ‘Labels & decals’ catalogue

www.asheinstitute.com 

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nebosh igc
HSE Manager Vacancy UAE

HSE Manager Required!

HSE Manager Vacancy UAE

Post: HSE Manager

Location: UAE

Qualification: NEBOSH IGC.  (IDIP Level 6 & ISO 45001 Preferred)

Experience Required: 7+ years in MEP Project mandatory.

Salary Package: 12k to 15k (AED)

Qualified and Interested candidates can send CV to hr@asheinstitute.com

Application will close on 3rd October 2018

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Safety officer training in kochi. join ashei 9447609617
Safety officer – Shutdown job

Safety officer – Shut down job

Qualification : Nebosh with relevant shutdown experience
Location : Beharin Shutdown Job
Contact number : 022 26670890, 26670891, 9930142001
Interview 2nd week of aug 2018
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nebosh HSE MANAGER PACKAGE ASHEI KOCHI 8606108000
HSE MANAGER PACKAGE ASHEI KOCHI

BSC Level 6 IDIP-OSH at Kochi 


HSE MANAGER PACKAGE ASHEI KOCHI

International Health and Safety Training From Qualified tutors at ASHEI… 

https://www.facebook.com/events/119608495574766/

 

Get yourself upgraded with ISO 45001!!!!
Lead Auditor Course @ ASHEI Kochi. (Migration from OHSAS)
Tentative date of course commencement on 25th May 2018.
Similarly Call us for migration Auditor training for Existing OHSAS 18001 LA. 

Lead Tutor Anil Menon CMIOSH FIIRSM OSHCR.


Contact: 9447609617, 8606108800

https://www.facebook.com/events/126414091483901/

 

 

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HSE Manager Combo at ASHEI 9447609617
ISO 45001 Auditor course OHSMS

ISO

ISO 45001 Auditor course

Get yourself upgraded from OHSAS 18001 to ISO 45001. course commence on 24 May at kochi. call 8606108000

ISO 45001 Auditor Course
Registration open for next batch
Call 9447609617 8606108000
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BSC level 6 international diploma course
British Safety Council IDIP (UK) Level 6

British Safety Council IDIP

IDIP course commence from Jul 24th at ASHEI Kochi.

British Safety council

Examination on Aug 8&9. To enrol mail to info@asheinstitute.com or call 9447609617. in order to register call us
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IOSH MANAGING SAFELY Version 5.0 @ ASHEI KOCHI 8606108000

IOSH MANAGING SAFELY Version 5.0 @ ASHEI 

IOSH MANAGING SAFELY

The Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) is a British organization for health and safety professionals.

The IOSH Managing Safely Certificate Course focuses on specially training the managers.

And supervisors of any organization.

The course helps them comprehend and adopt high standard occupational health and safety principles.

Practices in their particular work culture. In order to do the course call us.
Designed for managers and supervisors in any sector and in any country.
Certainly it Provides the knowledge and tools required to manage safely.
Peace of mind from training that’s designed and quality-controlled by us
Flexibility of delivery that suits your business.
Because of this course being UK certification, it is Internationally recognized and respected certification.
Efficient and effective learning – health, safety and environmental basics covered in a single program me
Memorable and thought-provoking facts and case studies.
Modules backed by clear examples and recognizable scenarios.
Summaries to reinforce key points
Checklists and materials supplied for subsequent use in the workplace.
Interactive quiz and discussions
Practical exercise based on the operations of a real business.
Successful delegates awarded a Managing Safely certificate.
Top 5 business benefits
Greater productivity – fewer hours lost to sickness and accidents.
Improved organisation-wide safety awareness culture and appreciation of safety measures.
Active staff involvement to improve the workplace.
Internationally recognized certification for managers and supervisors. Because of this course recognition it is advised to do this course

Top 5 delegate benefits
Ensures you can assess and control risks and hazards.
4 Days course

ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute 
IOSH|NEBOSH|BSC|MFA|OHSAS|IADC Rigpass. Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium. Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 94 476096 17, 85 928593 85
Email : info@asheinstitute.com, ashei.neena@gmail.com
Web : www.asheinstitute.com

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best training institute for safety courses
NEBOSH Command Words

NEBOSH Command Words

NEBOSH Command Words

There are many things to consider while attempting the NEBOSH, but the main thing that the student should follow is the NEBOSH Command Words. These are the most important to achieve the NEBOSH IGC in the first attempt. Most of the students don’t follow the rules and some of them don’t know about that so the reason they get failed. These are the following NEBOSH command words.

  1. Identify

To give reference to an item, which could be its name or title.

NB: normally a word or phrase will be sufficient, provided the reference is clear.

For Example:

Identify FOUR hazards associated with excavations? (4)

 Sufficient answers would include:

Collapse of the sides

Water Ingress

Falling Material

Undergrounds Services

  1. Give

To provide short, factual answers. To offer for consideration, acceptance, or use of another.

NB: normally a single word, phrase or sentence will be sufficient. Give an example of; Give the meaning of.

For Example:

Identify FOUR types of safety sign AND Give an example in EACH case. (4)

Sufficient answers would include:

Prohibition signs – eg No smoking

Warning signs – eg Caution hot surface

Mandatory signs – eg Wear ear protection

Emergency or safe condition signs – eg first-aid box

  1. Outline

To indicate the principal features or different parts of.

NB: an exhaustive description is not required. What is sought is a brief summary of the major aspects of whatever is stated in the question

To gain the marks for the outline example questions below, the same breadth of the answer is required as for an identify answer, but now, additional information will be required to satisfy the depth of an outline. NEBOSH Command Words

For Example:

Outline FOUR hazards associated with excavations? (4)

Sufficient answers would include:

Collapse of the sides – Unsupported trench or incorrect angle of the sides.

Water ingress –Through heavy rain or burst water main.

Falling materials –Spoil dug from excavation or materials and tools stored at ground level could fall in.

Underground services –Contact or rupturing of electricity, gas or water utilities.

  1. Describe

To give a detailed written account of the distinctive features of a subject. The account should be factual, without any attempt to explain.

When describing a subject (or object) a test of sufficient detail would be that another person would be able to visualize what you are describing.

For Example:

Describe the mechanical hazards associated with a bench grinder. (8)

A sufficient answer would be:

An entanglement hazard would be associated with the rotating spindle that the abrasive wheel is mounted on. Drawing in and trapping is associated with the gap between the tool rest and the rotating abrasive wheel. Friction or abrasion hazards would be associated with the surface of the rotating abrasive wheel and stabbing or puncture hazards could be created by flying fragments or pieces of ejected broken wheel.

  1. Explain

To provide an understanding. To make an idea or relationship clear.

NB: this command word is testing the candidate’s ability to know or understand why or how something happens. Is often associated with the words ‘how’ or ‘why’.

For Example:

Explain how sensitive protective equipment (trip device) can reduce the risk of contact with moving parts of machinery. (8)

A sufficient answer would be:

Sensitive protective equipment is designed to identify the presence of a person or body part within the danger zone of machinery. Examples of such devices include pressure mats and light beams that are connected to the machine controls and would stop the machine rapidly should a person or body part be detected.

Responding to command words in questions

It is important to read the whole question and to understand what the question requires as the command word on its own will need to be reinforced by the remainder of the question.

Many candidates miss out on gaining marks because they do not read the question carefully enough and do not think about their answer thoroughly before writing it down.

Candidates need to think about each question.

  • what is the command word?
  • how do I need to improve to gain marks?
  • when it is or is not relevant to the question?

In order to pass exam,  a brief answer plan is an essential aid to ensuring that answers are well thought out and structured.

NEBOSH applies a ‘positive marking’ approach; that is, marks are awarded for correct material in candidates’ answers, rather than being deducted for incorrect or missing material.

Remeber:

Guidance on NEBOSH Commands Words are very important to pass the NEBOSH in first attempt. NEBOSH Command Words

NEBOSH IGC Training @ Ashei Kochi Next batch registration Open. Get Qualified from Leading Trainers!!! Lead Tutor: Anilmenon CMIOSH FIIRSM OSHCR Class dates: 4th - 14th December 2017 Exam dates: 28&29 December 2017 To register call: 9447609617, 8606108000

ASHEI

An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute

IOSH|NEBOSH|BSC|MFA|OHSAS|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi

First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,

Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025

Phone : 0091 484 2343590

Mob : 91 94 476096 17, 85 928593 85

Email : info@asheinstitute.com, info.ashei@gmail.com

Web : www.asheinstitute.com

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nebosh igc in kochi call 9447609617
LIST OF INDIAN STANDARDS ON SAFETY & HEALTH

LIST OF INDIAN STANDARDS ON SAFETY & HEALTH

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NEBOSH IGC @ ASHEI KOCHI

TUTOR : ANILKUMAR TS MENON CMIOSH FIIRSM

OCTOBER BATCH REGISTRATION ONGOING…. 

CLASS STARTING ON: 9 – 19TH October 2017

EXAM DATE: 10 & 11 November 2017

Indian standards: Safety & health

SPECIAL OFFER FOR FRESHERS IN COMBO PACKS …

BOOK YOUR SEATS NOW….

TALK WITH EXPERT : 9745 12 6655 , 944 760 9617

VISIT OUR WEBSITE : www.asheinstitute.com

http://asheinstitute.bmeurl.co/74678B5

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risks from electricity

risks from electricity

What are the risks from electricity?

Harm can be caused to any person when they are exposed to ‘live parts’ that are either touched directly or indirectly by means of some conducting object or material. Voltages over 50 volts AC or 120 volts DC are considered hazardous.

Electricity can kill. Each year about 1000 accidents at work involving electric shocks or burns are reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Around 30 of these are fatal, most of them arising from contact with overhead or underground power cables.

Shocks from faulty equipment can cause severe and permanent injury and can also lead to indirect injuries, due to falls from ladders, scaffolds, or other work platforms.

Faulty electrical appliances can also lead to fires. As well as causing injuries and loss of life, fires cause damage to plant, equipment and property.

WHO IS MOST AT RISK FROM ELECTRICITY?

Anyone can be exposed to the dangers of electricity while at work and everyone should be made aware of the dangers.

Those most at risk include maintenance staff, those working with electrical plant, equipment and machinery, and people working in harsh environments such as construction sites.

Most electrical accidents occur because individuals:

  • are working on or near equipment which is thought to be dead but which is, in fact, live
  • are working on or near equipment which is known to be live, but where those involved are without adequate training or appropriate equipment, or they have not taken adequate precautions
  • misuse equipment or use electrical equipment which they know to be faulty.

ASSESSING THE RISKS FROM ELECTRICITY

Consider the following hazards in your risk assessment:

Live parts Normal mains voltage, 230 volts AC, can kill. Also, contact with live parts can cause shocks and burns.

Fire Electrical faults can cause fires. This is particularly true where the equipment contains a heat source (e.g. heaters, including water heaters, washing machines, ovens, heat-seal packaging equipment).

Flammable or explosive atmospheres Electricity can be a source of ignition in a potentially flammable or explosive atmosphere, e.g. in spray paint booths or around refuelling areas.

Where and how electricity is used The risks from electricity are greatest in harsh conditions.

In wet conditions, unsuitable equipment can easily become live and can make its surroundings live.

While outdoors, equipment may not only become wet but may be at greater risk of damage.

In cramped with a lot of earthed metalwork, such as inside tanks, ducts and silos, if an electrical fault develops it can be very difficult to avoid a shock.

Types of equipment in use Some items of equipment can also involve greater risk than others. Extension leads are particularly liable to damage to their plugs and sockets, cables, and electrical connections. Other flexible leads, particularly those connected to equipment that is moved a great deal, can suffer from similar problems.

BASIC ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Below are some minimum steps you should take to ensure electrical safety.

Mains supplies

  • install new electrical systems to BS 7671 Requirements for Electrical Installations
  • maintain all electrical installations in good working order
  • provide enough socket-outlets for equipment in use
  • avoid overloading socket-outlets – using adaptors can cause fires
  • provide an accessible and clearly identified switch (‘Emergency Off’ or ‘EMO’ button) near fixed machinery to cut off power in an emergency
  • for portable equipment, connect to nearby socket-outlets so that it can be easily disconnected in an emergency.

Use the right equipment

  • choose electrical equipment that is suitable for its working environment
  • ensure that equipment is safe when supplied and maintain it in a safe condition
  • electrical equipment used in flammable/explosive atmospheres should be designed not to produce sparks. Seek specialist advice when choosing this type of equipment.
  • protect light bulbs and other easily damaged equipment – there is a risk of electric shock if they are broken.

Maintenance and repairs

  • ensure equipment is fitted with the correctly rated fuse.
  • ensure cable ends always have their outer sheaths firmly clamped to stop wires working loose from plugs or inside equipment
  • replace damaged sections of cable completely – never repair cuts with insulating tape.
  • use proper connectors to join lengths of cable – don’t use connector blocks covered in insulating tape or ‘splice’ wires by twisting them together
  • some equipment is double insulated. These are often marked with a ‘double-square’ symbol. The supply leads have only two wires – live (brown) and neutral (blue)
  • make sure all wires are connected securely if the 13A plug is not a moulded-on type.

GOOD PRACTICES:

Use other forms of power where possible Electrical risks can sometimes be eliminated by using air, hydraulic or hand-powered tools. These are especially useful in harsh conditions, but remember they could introduce other hazards.

Reduce the voltage Using lower voltages can reduce or eliminate the risks of electric shocks and burns:

  • portable tools are available which can be run from a 110 volts, centre-tapped-to-earth supply, (usually from a transformer)
  • where electrically powered tools are used, battery-operated are safest
  • temporary lighting can be run at lower voltages, e.g. 12, 25, 50 or 110 volts.

Use Residual Current Devices (RCDs) for extra safety An RCD can provide additional safety. An RCD detects some (but not all) faults in the electrical system and rapidly switches off the supply.

The best place for an RCD is built into the main supply or the socket-outlet, as this means that the supply cables are permanently protected.

If this is not possible, use a plug incorporating an RCD or a plug-in RCD adaptor. RCDs for protecting people have a rated tripping current (sensitivity) of not more than 30 milliamps (mA).

Remember:

  • an RCD is a valuable safety device – never bypass it
  • if the RCD trips, it is a sign there is a fault. Check the system before using it again.
  • if the RCD trips frequently and no fault can be found in the system, consult the manufacturer of the RCD
  • use the RCD test button regularly to check that its mechanism is free and functioning

Join ASHEI… Be a certified Safety Professional.
Registration going on for May batch. Few seats available. Last days……………………..
NEBOSH, IOSH, IADC RIGPASS, OSH DIPLOMA, CIEH, OHSAS, BSE LEVEL 6 etc…
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|CIEH|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium,
Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 9447609617
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com

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First aid courses in kochi
EMS Auditor – ISO 14001:2015 Training Course @ ASHEI Kochi 8606108000 www.asheinstitute.com

EMS Auditor  – ISO 14001:2015 Training Course @ ASHEI Kochi 8606108000 www.asheinstitute.com

IRCA Certified EMS Auditor / Lead Auditor – ISO 14001:2015 Training Course


EMS Auditor- IRCA is the leading professional body for management system auditors and offers a globally recognized business qualification. IRCA represents over 10,000 registered auditors in 150 countries and every year, around 60,000 delegates attend an IRCA certified training course. Also IRCA Certified courses are recognized as an industry

IRCA recognize that attending a training course is usually a major commitment, both in terms of cost and time. When choosing the right training organizations and the right course make sure you look for those that display the IRCA certification mark. However IRCA only approves organizations that have demonstrated a high standard of technical and training expertise. All training organizations approved by IRCA must demonstrate that they have the competence to achieve the learning outcomes for each course and to examine the performance of students

Who will benefit?

Quality-Managers (QA/QC Personnel), Engineers, Professionals in Environmental Fields (Chemical, Leather, Paint, etc.,), Technical Experts. Document Controllers, Internal Auditors, Implementation Managers. NBA / NAAC Coordinators & Consultants, Management System / ISO / TQM Consultants.

Students and Job seekers in Quality field /Abroad Placements /Career Development.

Learning Objectives

On Completion, Successful students will have the knowledge and skills to :  Knowledge

  • Explain the purpose of an environmental management system, of environmental management systems standards, of a management system audit and third-party certification, and the business and societal benefits of improving environmental performance.
  • Explain the role and responsibilities of an auditor to plan, conduct, report and follow-up an environmental management system audit in accordance with ISO 19011 and ISO/IEC 17021, as applicable.

Course Format

  • Course Program
  • In order to get certification, need to attend course for 5 days. Each day is divided into four sessions, two before lunch and two after lunch.
  • The first session precedes the mid-morning break and the second follows mid morning break.
  • The afternoon sessions are similarly divided.
  • The output of the exercise is a part of the formal continuous assessment and will therefore be marked.
  • Although the exercises are group exercises individual score to the delegate will be based on their overall participation.
  • A mock audit – Role play will be conducted on Days 4 & 5 of the Training for the delegates to demonstrate the skills learned and understood during the course. All sessions are interactive and delegate participation is encouraged.
  • You will need to allow sufficient time to read and understand the notes which have been provided.

Course Style

  • All sessions are delegate interactive and delegate participation is encouraged. Delivery will include presentations by lecture, overhead and slide projection.
  • There are numerous exercises and each activity is assessed as part of the overall candidature evaluation.
  • A model factory will be used and wherever possible practical illustrations will be given. All course presenters will have experience of QMS design and implementation, and have some experience of QMS certification and assessment.

 

A live audit in a host organization(or an audit role play) will take place on day 4 so as the delegates may demonstrates the skills learned and developed during the course.

 

IRCA Registration

TVE CERT is an IRCA registered Training Organization. This QMS Auditor / Lead Auditor– ISO 14001:2015 (A17970) Training Course is registered by the IRCA

Expected Prior knowledge

Before starting this course, you must inform students that they are expected to have the following prior knowledge:

  1. a) Management systems

  • The Plan, Do, Check, Act (PDCA) cycle
  • The core elements of a management system and the interrelationship between top management responsibility, policy, objectives, planning, implementation, measurement, review, and continual improvement.
  1. b) Environmental management

The intended outcomes of an environmental management system:

  • Enhancement of environmental performance
  • Fulfillment of compliance obligations
  • Achievement of environmental objectives
  1. c) ISO 14001

 In order to get certification candidates should have Knowledge of the requirements of ISO 14001 and the commonly used environmental management terms and definitions, as given in ISO 14001, which may be gained by completing an IRCA Certified EMS Foundation Training course or the equivalent.

ISO 14001 :2015 Lead Auditor Course in Kerala dial : 8606108000

Highlights

Training Programs are handled by Highly Experienced and IRCA Qualified Lead Auditors.

The Batches once committed will not be cancelled

Course Period : 5 consecutive Days Start Time 09:00; Finish Time 18:00

Exam : There is a 2 hours close book exam on the final day (pass mark 70%)

ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
 
IOSH|NEBOSH|BSC|MFA|OHSAS|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 94 476096 17, 85 928593 85
Email : info@asheinstitute.com, ashei.neena@gmail.com
Web : 
www.asheinstitute.com

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Health And Safety Auditing In Ernakulam | Cochin

International Safety course in kochi!!!

Health And Safety Auditing In Ernakulam / Cochin

ISO 45001: 2018  IRCA Approved LA Training Course @ ASHEI Kochi

Training By ANILKUMAR TS MENON

 

We conduct batches every month for ISO 45001:2018 LA,

EMS- ISO 14001:2015 LA,

ISO 45001:2018- Migration course for OHSAS 18001 certifications.

Venue: ASHE Institute Kochi

Registration Open!!!

Call: 9447609617, 8606108000, 9745126655

ASHE Institute is based at Cochin, Kerala. We organize International Safety courses like NEBOSH (UK), OSHA (USA), IOSH (UK) and Medic First Aid (USA). Our vision is to provide world class Safety Training at very affordable investment.

 

ISO 14001:2015 EMS LA (IRCA Certified ) Training Course (IRCA Ref A17970)

First of all International Registrar for Certified Auditors is the leading professional body for management system auditors. They represents over 10,000 registered auditors in 150 countries and every year. Also around 60,000 delegates attend an IRCA certified training course. Therefore this certification course is recognized in every industry

IRCA recognize that attending a training course is usually a major commitment, both in terms of cost and time. When choosing the right training organizations. And the right course make sure you look for those that display the IRCA certification mark. It only approves organizations that have demonstrated a high standard of technical and training expertise.

Who will benefit?

ISO 14001 will benefit Quality-Managers (QA/QC Personnel), Engineers. Almost all Professionals in Environmental Fields (Chemical, Leather, Paint, etc.,), Technical Experts. Also Document Controllers, Internal Auditors, Implementation Managers. In addition NBA / NAAC Coordinators & Consultants, Management System / ISO / TQM Consultants.

Furthermore ISO 14001 will benefit Students and Job seekers in Quality field /Abroad Placements /Career Development.

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Safety officer training in kochi. join ashei 9447609617
Accident Investigation

Accident Investigation

WHAT IS IT?

Accident investigation is the process of determining the root causes of accidents, on-the-job injuries, property damage, and close calls in order to prevent them from occurring again.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

Accident investigation will lead you to the real cause of why something happened, and armed with that knowledge, you can take affirmative steps to prevent future accidents from occurring.

WHAT IS REQUIRED?

  • Develop an accident investigation process that focuses on:

o fact finding, not fault finding

o determining the root causes of why the event occurred

o making changes so the event does not happen again.

  • Set a policy that accidents and close calls (large and small) will be investigated with equal vigor.
  • Provide training and tools to staff conducting accident investigations.
  • Audit completed investigations to ensure they are being completed on a timely basis with an adequate level of detail.

HOW DO YOU DO IT?

Workplace accidents should be investigated as soon as possible after they occur. The goals of a timely and thorough accident investigation should be to:

  • determine the cause of the accident
  • prevent the accident from happening again
  • improve health and safety conditions in the workplace
  • determine whether a violation of federal or state safety and health standards contributed to the accident
  • determine company or individual liability in case of future legal action
  • determine the need for repairs or replacement of damaged items
  • determine the need for additional education and training for employees.

A thorough and complete accident investigation involves several steps, specifically:

  • background investigation
  • site investigation
  • interviews
  • analysis and reporting.

The following outline discusses these steps in more detail.

Background investigation

  • Review the employment and injury records of any injured employee(s) and/or others whose actions contributed to the accident.
  • Review reports of any injuries and/or damage to equipment, machines, building, or property.
  • Compile a list of witnesses to the accident.
  • Gather information about normal conditions and/or operations of the area. Information would include maps, floor plans, wiring diagrams, and any other piping or architectural drawings or operational guidelines.
  • Meet with supervisors and other employees responsible for the affected area and employees of the affected area to outline the purpose and goals of the investigation. Ensure that there is a basic understanding of the materials, equipment, operation, or process involved.

Site investigation

  • Arrive at the scene of the accident as soon as possible after the incident has occurred.
  • Restrict the accident scene to authorized persons during the site investigation.
  • Ensure that movable evidence is secured to prevent tampering or other changes.
  • Determine what physical changes may have occurred following the accident. Changes could be attributed to clean-up, weather, maintenance, and normal usage.
  • Tour the entire area and record pertinent initial perceptions of the status and condition of building, grounds, equipment, lighting, and ventilation.
  • Sketch or draw parts of the accident scene where equipment or machinery involved in the accident is located or where actions that contributed to the accident occurred. Use the following guidelines when sketching or drawing an accident scene:
    • Use squared (graph) paper. If distance or size is important determine the value for each square and note this at the bottom of each sketch.
    • Orient each sketch with an arrow pointing north.
    • Label all objects.
    • Use arrows to indicate paths of travel of individuals and/or vehicles.
    • Indicate the distance of movable objects from two fixed locations.
    • Note the location of witnesses present at the time of the accident.
  • Take photographs of the overall scene, damaged areas, and pertinent machinery and/or equipment. Photographs should be made before any adjustments occur to the scene of the accident.
  • Prior to taking photographs, determine if the area has been altered. If items have been moved or changed, do not move them back for photographs. Photograph items as found, yet document the change and the individual responsible or knowledgeable of the change.
  • For close-ups, use reference items such as a ruler or level measurer to indicate size or slope of the items photographed. For each close-up, photograph the same item from a distance to provide a reference. Photograph the area where the injured worker(s) were found, using reference marks to indicate individuals’ placement.

Interviews

  • Prepare a list of witnesses and other individuals to be interviewed.
  • When possible, do not allow more than 24 hours to elapse before conducting interviews.
  • Conduct interviews in a private setting to avoid interruptions and distractions.
  • Prepare a list of questions in advance of any interview. Use questions that require narrative answers. Avoid questions that suggest an expected answer (Example: “Isn’t it true that the injured employee was running?”) or that can be answered with either “yes” or “no.” Questions should be structured from the following six key elements: Who? What? Where? When? How? Why?

o Who questions identify all parties involved.

o What questions identify pertinent actions, events, and physical objects.

o Where questions locate participants, witnesses, and key objects involved in the accident.

o When questions determine the time of the accident and establish relationships between pairs of activities or events.

o How questions provide information on the interaction and relationships among participants, equipment, and the events leading up to, during, and after the accident.

o Why questions determine unsafe acts or hazardous conditions.

  • Before starting the interview, advise the person to be interviewed that the purpose of the session is to determine the cause of the accident and to prevent any future occurrence.
  • Start the interview by asking the individual to describe what happened. Do not interrupt with questions.
  • After the individual has given his or her initial statement, ask the prepared questions and any additional questions prompted by the individual’s statement.
  • Record the individual’s statement, the questions asked, and the answers received in the order that they occur. Let the individual talk, but not ramble. Interrupt when necessary to turn the conversation back to the subject at hand.
  • Close the interview when all questions have been answered and when the individual indicates no additional information can be provided. Encourage the individual to contact you if other pertinent information comes to mind. Immediately after the interview, review the individual’s statement and answers and record your impressions and judgments.

Analysis and reporting

After all fact-finding efforts are complete, analyze the data to determine all causes of the accident. Then prepare a comprehensive report outlining the identified causes and describing corrective measures to prevent similar future accidents. To best understand why an accident occurred and to plan for preventive actions, it is important to realize that most accidents have more than one cause. It is important to realize that an accident may be the result of the interaction of seemingly unrelated events.

Causes

The cause of an accident is any behavior, condition, act, or omission without which the accident may not have happened, or the severity of the injuries would have been less. Causes can be characterized as direct, indirect, or contributing.

  • Direct causes are acts or omissions that directly relate to the accident. These could include workers or other individuals who:

o operate equipment in an unsafe manner or operate equipment known to have safety defects or deficiencies

o do not follow required or necessary safety precautions or procedures

o fail to correct known damage to or faulty operations of equipment, machinery, or vehicles.

  • Indirect causes are conditions that directly contribute to the occurrence of a direct cause. These causes could include:

o defective or unusual conditions of equipment, machinery, vehicles, buildings, or grounds

o defective or unusual conditions of workers or other individuals, such as intoxication, physical defects or limitations, or psychological defects or limitations

o hazardous or unusual conditions of weather.

  • Contributing causes are conditions, programs, acts, or omissions that are not directly related to the accident but did contribute to the occurrence or existence of a direct or indirect cause. These causes could include lack of or inadequate:

o safety program

o training programs

o preventive maintenance programs

o corrective maintenance programs

o supervision

o enforcement

o design of equipment, machinery, vehicles, or facilities

o advisory or warning communication, labels, or signs.

 

Analysis

  • Collect and correlate data. The following are examples of materials that can be used to ascertain all causes related to the accident. These materials should be collected and organized to allow investigators to review all information at one time:

o summary of employment and injury records of pertinent employees

o summary of orientation and training records for pertinent employees

o summary of normal conditions and/or operation of the pertinent area

o description of usual and safe operations or use of materials, equipment, facilities, operations, or processes involved

o summary of inspections of materials, equipment, and facilities involved

o summary of witness statements that includes an outline of areas of agreement and disagreement between statements

o summary of pertinent records of preventive maintenance or repair

o written company policies or directives that pertain to the materials, equipment, facilities, operations, or processes involved.

  • Review data and pose hypothetical causes. The investigator should review all pertinent data. After the initial review, the investigator should outline potential direct, indirect, and contributing causes. It is important that all potential causes be listed and that the investigator not draw preliminary conclusions as to the probability that a potential cause was or was not related to the incident. It may be helpful to have a second individual conduct an independent review of the pertinent data to list all of the potential causes.
  • Test potential causes. Review again the pertinent data looking for specific data that affirm or reject each potential cause. Connect related direct, indirect, and contributing causes.

 

Reporting

A written report should be generated that contains the following sections:

  • Statement of the problem. This section should include:

o a review of the incident

o a summary of injuries, lost time, and equipment and/or property damage.

  • Review of the data. This section should include:

o a summary of witness statements

o a summary of relevant findings concerning the accident and work history of affected employees and the operation of machinery or equipment

o a storyboard with photographs or sketches

o an overview of existing, written company policies or directives.

  • Causes. This section should list the direct, indirect, and contributing causes that have been affirmed by the data. A reference should be made to the data that support each cause.
  • Recommendations. These should be based directly on each of the noted causes. These recommendations could include the following:

o more or improved training for employees

o new company policies or directives, or better clarification or dissemination of existing ones

o improved communication between employees, supervisors, and management

o design or operation changes or improvements to machines, equipment, or processes

o different or improved safety equipment

o different or improved protection from natural phenomena or disasters

o different or improved systems to account for possible physical, physiological, or psychological limitations of employees, customers, or others.

 

ASHEI

1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025

Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385

info@asheinstitute.com

UPCOMING TRAINING DATES

IOSH : 1/09/2017

NEBOSH IGC : 11/09/2017

NEBOSH HSW : 24/09/2017

OHSAS 18001 : 24/08/2017

MEDIC FIRST AID : 30/08/2017

IADC RIGPASS : 24/08/2017

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Scaffolder vacancy Future is bright When Safety is right! International Safety training in kochi. ISO 45001 & ISO 14001-EMS registration open. Call: 9447609617, 8606108000
SCAFFOLDER VACANCY

URGENT VACANCY FOR DUBAI DRY DOCK

SCAFFOLDER VACANCY

DESIGNATION: SCAFFOLDERS

QUALIFICATION:  2-3 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN SHIPYARD DOING SCAFFOLDING WORK/SCAFFOLDER vacancy & TRAINING FROM RECOGNISED TRAINING CENTRE

PACKAGE:  1400 AED + FOOD & ACCOMMODATION + OT
5 DAYS WORK & 2 DAYS OFF

Qualified candidates can sent CV to hr@asheinstitute.com

Scaffolder training @ ashei
Date: 12th August 2017
Time: 10 am
Venue: ASHE Institute
For registration & details: 9447609617, 8606108000
www.asheinstitute.com

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International Safety courses in kochi
Safety officer Vacancy @ ASHEI

Safety officer Vacancy @ ASHEI

Job Title: Safety officer – 5 Numbers
Job Location: Kuwait
Education Qualification:
1) Diploma/Degree in relevant discipline with certificate in HSE or equivalent.
2) NEBOSH / OHSA / IOSH certificate or diploma in safety is an added advantage.
Salary: 200 – 300 Kuwait Dinar
Experience: 5 Years
Email: hr@kmpconsultant.com
Tel: 9840880251
Consultancy: KMP Consulting Engineers
NOTE : Shall have a valid Kuwaiti Driving License.

 

ASHEI is pleased to announce NEBOSH IGC going to start from 07th Aug 2017
Last Date of Registration : 27/07/2017
NOW ATTEMPT YOUR NEBOSH IGC PAPERS ONE BY ONE!
Important Information:
Trainer: Dr. Anilkumar TS Menon CMIOSH , FIIRSM & NEBOSH Approved Trainer
Examination: 30& 31 st AUG 2017
We don’t compromise on Quality & Standards. Inquire 1st before enrolling to the course providers. For guidance and career counseling do not hesitate to contact us.
ASHEI
1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025
Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385
info@asheinstitute.com

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NEBOSH HSW @ ASHEI KOCHI

Health and Safety at Work Qualification

Health and Safety at work – HSW – A perfect introduction to health and safety.
This introductory qualification will help improve the safety culture in your organisation. By equipping your workforce to identify and deal with hazards at work. Hence it will help to reduce accidents and achieving cost savings for the business.
The qualification being fulfilling the needs of an international audience. There is no content on UK law. The multiple choice assessment is currently available in English, Arabic, Mandarin, French, European Spanish and Russian.
In order to  achieve this qualification student need to attend 3 days course. This course is an ideal first step towards other higher level NEBOSH qualifications including NEBOSH’s International General Certificate and National General Certificate.

ASHEI Accredited Centre for NEBOSH

What kind of people take the NEBOSH Health and Safety at Work qualification?

This introductory qualification is aimed at anyone who needs to understand the principles of health and safety as part of their job. The typical people who would benefit from this qualification include:
Team leaders and supervisors
HR professionals
Facilities managers
Those working with young people in a training environment.
Also this qualification has been accredited and credit rated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) and sits in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF).

Tutor: Anilkumar TS Menon CMIOSH FIIRSM

ASHEI
1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025
Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385
info@asheinstitute.com

ASHE Institute

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https://youtu.be/dhl0ffWPA0A
IADC Rigpass

IADC Rig Pass Course

IADC HSE Rig Pass program ready for instant use!

Ideal for the small & medium sized in-house contractor programs or commercial training organizations.
Highlights:
  • Pre-approved HSE Rig Pass curriculum –facilitates provider accreditation *
  • Suitable for classroom, rig-based, or “on the road” delivery.
  • Interactive learning exercises
  • Innovative point and click “Mind Map” system
  • Pre-approved test questions
  • Compliant with Safe Gulf & Safe Land USA

Courses Offered ASHEI @ Kochi

Program Materials:

  • Participant Guide*
  • Facilitator Guide–includes:
    • All instructional materials needed for training delivery
    • Lesson plans that keep course delivery on track and on time
    • Assessments after each module
    • Comprehensive final exam with answer key
    • Facilitator tips
    On the 5th day of the training you will be having a descriptive type exam and the certificate will be issued with in 20 days. You can also verify the certification in IADC site.
1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025
Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385
info@asheinstitute.com

Trainer : Anilkumar TS Menon CMIOSH FIIRSM

UPCOMING TRAINING SCHEDULED
IOSH : 1 to 3 every month
NEBOSH IGC : 9-19 every month
NEBOSH HSW : 24 -26 every month
ISO 45001: 24-28 every month
EMS 14001 : 19-23 every month
MEDIC FIRST AID : every Saturdays
IADC RIGPASS : 24-26 every month
ASHEI Candidates from 2011-2016
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IOSH courses in kerala
OHSAS 18001 Auditor Migration to ISO 45001: 2018 course!

OHSAS 18001 Auditor Migration to ISO 45001: 2018 at ASHEI

http://asheinstitute.bmeurl.co/71A35E0

OHSAS 18001 Auditor Migration to ISO 45001: 2018!

BECOME AN IRCA APPROVED AUDITOR!!!!!!!!
BATCHES EVERY MONTH
Next batch commencing soon. Registration started…
First of all IRCA Auditor courses are the accepted bench mark for management systems auditor training (www.irca.org). Also ISO 45001 is effective OHSMS which is implemented in 2018, finally.

Who will benefit?

  1. Management Representatives, OHSAS/Safety Consultants.
  2. ISO / TQM consultants, Health and Safety consultants
  3. Fire& Safety officers.
  4. Personnel from Institutions / Companies aiming for and working towards Safety Certification
  5. Students / Job Seekers in Safety field / Career development

 

Learning Objectives

Consequently there are eight learning objectives describe in outline to cover. Furthermore delegates shall be able to cover these objectives in one day. Because it is migration, delegates will need to demonstrate acceptable performance in all those areas. In order to complete the course successfully, the eight learning objectives are as follows:
Firstly understand the scope and fields of application of the OH&S management systems and standards and where applicable, other criteria and standards against which an audit could be performed
Secondly understand the techniques available, process and principles of risk assessment and their significance in the process of self-regulation for all OH&S requirements.
Thirdly identify the requirements of the OH&S management system standards against which an audit is to be performed.
4. Explain the differences between the OH&S management system standards and the international standards for Quality and Environmental Management Systems.
5. Describe the roles and responsibilities of Auditors and Lead Auditors in the context of OH&S management systems audits.
6. Explain the rationale supporting the implementation of OH&S management systems or the integration of OH&S requirements into existing management systems.
7. Plan, prepare, perform and report both verbally and in writing an audit of the management and operation of an organization in accordance with the requirements of established relevant audit criteria.
Finally collect and analyze evidence, exercising objectivity, and make and communicate decisions of the significance of observations made

The delegates will be issued ISO 45001 certification as  a result, so they will be qualified to become lead auditor in this standard.
Course Period 1 Day

Start Time 09:00; Finish Time 18:00

Exam There is a 1hoursClose book exam on the final day (pass mark 70%)

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NEBOSH GC3 – HEALTH AND SAFETY PRACTICAL APPLICATION – UNIT : III

GC3 Guidance and information for candidates

 NEBOSH GC3 is the third paper to pass the nebosh IGC Qualification.
First of all this document provides comprehensive guidance on the presentation and submission of the Unit GC3 practical application. Also it includes guidance on the structure and style of the report. Furthermore candidates should study this document carefully before submitting their practical application.
Finally the guidance should be read carefully in conjunction with the practical application mark scheme. So it is included in this guidance document, to provide a clear guide to the requirements of the practical application.

Introduction

The aim of this unit is to assess a candidate’s ability to complete successfully two activities:
Firstly to carry out, unaided, a safety inspection of a workplace, identifying the more common hazards.  Also deciding whether they are adequately controlled and, where necessary. consequently suggesting appropriate and cost effective control measures.
Secondly, To prepare a report that persuasively urges management to take appropriate action. Certainly explaining why such action is needed (including reference to possible breaches of standards).As a result candidate need to  identify practical legislation and control measures that should be implemented.
This will require candidates to apply the knowledge and understanding gained from their studies of elements of Units NGC1 and GC2 or Units IGC1 and GC2 in a practical environment and to carry out an evaluation of information gathered during the inspection. The time allowed to complete the assessment is not restricted but candidates should aim to complete the inspection and the report in two hours. The practical application may be submitted in the candidate’s own handwriting or be word processed.
The submission must include:
· completed observation sheets covering a number and range of hazards and good practice, identifying suitable control measures and timescales;
· an introduction and executive summary;
· main findings of the completed inspection;
· conclusions which summarise the main issues identified in the candidate’s workplace;
· completed recommendations table.
The practical application must be carried out in the candidate’s own workplace. The workplace should be large enough to provide a sufficient range of hazards in the areas covered to provide an adequate range for identification. If the workplace is very large, in order that the practical application is manageable the candidate should limit the area considered.
Where the candidate does not have access to a workplace, the course provider should be consulted to help in making arrangements for the candidate to carry out the practical application at suitable premises. Providers seeking to run the practical in this way should contact NEBOSH for advice and approval.
Management at the premises should be consulted to ensure the candidate can carry out the inspection without endangering their own health and safety.
Where confidentiality requires, locations and company names may be omitted from the report, or alternatively guidance should be sought from NEBOSH.
Candidates do not require supervision when carrying out the practical application but the candidate must sign a declaration that the submission is their own work (Appendix 1). If this declaration is not submitted the candidate’s result may be declared void. A signature can be electronic or can be faxed.
Candidates must note that accredited course providers cannot comment on practical applications before submission or marking.
Candidates, employers and internal assessors should be aware that the status of the inspection undertaken to fulfil the requirements of Unit GC3 is for educational purposes only.

Date of Assessment

Assessment of the practical unit (GC3) must normally take place within 10 working days of (before or after) the date of the NGC1/IGC1 and/or GC2 written papers (the ‘date of the examination’). The results sheet completed by the accredited course provider must reach NEBOSH by no later than 15 working days after the date of the examination (Appendix 2).
If a candidate is absent from the written papers because of illness corroborated by a doctor’s note, but successfully completes the GC3 unit within the 10 working day deadline, the result will stand. If a candidate is unable to complete the GC3 unit under similar circumstances, NEBOSH may allow it to be taken at a later date beyond the normal 10 working day deadline.
The accredited course provider should advise the candidate of the latest date by which the completed report and observation sheets must be received by the course provider for marking. It is the responsibility of the course provider to ensure that the results of the practical (GC3) are available to NEBOSH by no later than 15 working days after the date of the examination for NGC1/IGC1 and/or GC2.
Completion of study for both NGC1 and GC2 or IGC1 and GC2 is recommended in order to undertake the practical application unit GC3.
Candidates planning to post their reports to the course provider should be reminded of the need to guard against loss in the post by sending their work by trackable delivery. Candidates are therefore advised to retain copies of both their completed observation sheets and report.

Marking

Practical applications will be marked by an internal assessor – a person proposed to NEBOSH by an accredited course provider and approved by NEBOSH. Internal assessors will be at least Grad IOSH of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health or equivalent and working towards chartered membership, CMIOSH, (or similar).
A marking sheet (Appendix 3) will be completed by the internal assessor for each candidate and attached to the candidate’s report. The total percentage mark for each candidate will be transferred to a results sheet (Appendix 2) and returned to NEBOSH by no later than 15 working days after the examination date of NGC1/ICG1 and/or GC2.
Candidates must achieve the pass standard (60%) in this unit in order to satisfy the criteria for the qualification.

Moderation

Marked GC3 assessments are subject to external moderation by NEBOSH to monitor the standard being set and marks awarded by the internal assessor may be adjusted accordingly.
The observation sheets and report should not be sent to NEBOSH unless they are called in. However, the observation sheet and report should be retained with the mark sheet for each candidate for at least six weeks following the date of issue by NEBOSH of the examination results to which they relate. Practical applications may be called in at any time from the date of examination until six weeks after the issue of results.
Candidates may lodge an EAR (enquiry about result) within the timeframe as advised on their URN (unit result notification).

Retention of practical samples by accredited course providers

NEBOSH monitors the consistency of internal assessment by accredited course providers (eg practicals marked by the course provider) over time. Accredited course providers are therefore required to retain representative samples of practical applications (eg high pass, low pass, refer) for each standard sitting or cohort for a rolling three year period.
The sample of practicals to be retained by accredited course providers will be no more than 24 scripts per year per qualification, but providers may choose to retain more for internal quality assurance purposes. Providers should retain the archived sample for three years in a manner that makes them easily retrievable. This is intended to enable course provider staff to monitor the standards of candidate performance in the practical application over time, and make improvements to their delivery when necessary. Additionally, the samples will serve as exemplar materials for practical application assessors appointed by accredited course providers to use as guidance in their assessment decisions.
Sampling of accredited course provider-marked scripts enables NEBOSH to ensure that the standard of marking for internal assessment remains consistent over time both within and between accredited course providers. Using archived materials in this way is intended to maintain marking standards and enhance parity between the marks before and after moderation.
Other scripts should be disposed of as confidential waste.

Completion of observation sheets

Candidates will be supplied with a sufficient number of observation sheets from a course provider which may be photocopied for the purpose. An example observation sheet is given at Appendix 4. The observation sheets must be completed during the inspection. Only brief details of each hazard are required including where the hazard was located and the consequences of the hazard. For example, ‘housekeeping could be better’ does not give enough information about the particular hazard.
The observation sheets should be completed by:
· identifying, in the left hand column, any hazards, unsafe work practices and examples of good practice observed during the inspection;
· commenting in the next column, on the adequacy of existing controls and identifying any immediate and longer term remedial actions needed;
· stating, in the right hand column a reasonable timescale for the actions identified.
There should be sufficient information on the observation sheets to enable the candidate to complete a report to management on their findings. Candidates are also advised to make notes on the area inspected, including activities taking place, in order to complete the introduction to their report. Whilst poor spelling and grammar will not be marked or penalised, if the assessor is unable to read or to understand the notes made by candidates during their inspection then invariably fewer marks will be awarded than would otherwise have been the case. The practical application may be submitted in the candidate’s own handwriting or word processed.

Marking of observation sheets

Candidates are advised to refer to the marking sheet given at Appendix 3 and the marking matrix given at Appendix 6.
Range and outline of hazards and consequences (15 marks)
Candidates should outline 20 uncontrolled hazards to gain maximum marks, but are strongly recommended to outline more than 20 (but no more than 30) in case of duplication or inappropriate hazards being outlined. Student must demonstrate their understanding of how identified hazards have the potential to cause harm, for example, boxes stored on the floor may cause obstruction of access, egress routes and / or a potential of musculoskeletal injury if lifted. This information must be recorded in the ‘Hazards and consequences’ column.
Also students are expected to outline different types of hazards such as hazardous substances, fire, electrical, work equipment, ergonomic, housekeeping, noise, vibration, transport, manual handling and health hazards and should also consider if there are any welfare and environmental problems. At least five different types of hazard must be included for maximum marks. In addition candidates are expected to comment on situations where there is adequate control of hazards and where good practice is being observed, although candidates should place the emphasis on uncontrolled hazards. A maximum of 1 mark is available for good practice.
Candidates who repeat identical hazards will only be awarded ONE mark for that hazard (eg inadequate labelling of an unknown chemical substance). Candidates should focus on physical conditions and not on poor policies and procedures.
It is important to note that credit can only be gained in this section for clearly outlined hazards.
Identification of suitable control measures and timescales (15 marks)
Candidates are expected to give thought to what is required to immediately control the risk from each outlined hazard AND to identify the need for long term actions to control the risk.
This requires candidates to distinguish between the symptoms and the root causes of hazards.
For example, the immediate action on a spillage may be ‘clean up spillage and inform supervisor’ whereas longer term actions might include appropriate supervisor training, regular inspections, and investigation of the source of the leak. A further longer term action may be to modify the work process to tackle the root cause. The proposed control measures must not only remove or control the hazard but must also be realistic in terms of timescales. Candidates should indicate a measure of time eg supervisor training to be completed within three months.
If existing controls are in place and considered adequate, candidates should consider any measures required to maintain this level of control.
Candidates should avoid generic phrases being repeatedly used eg ‘monitor’ and ‘train staff’. Student should give appropriate clarification by giving examples of appropriate monitoring and the type of training required.
Also candidates should be aware that if unsuitable control measures are suggested full marks cannot be awarded. Short term measures to improve housekeeping will do little to improve the lack of safety management systems and procedures evidenced by materials and equipment left lying around.
Student should also note that where the hazard is not clearly outlined full credit cannot be gained for control measures as assessors will be unable to determine appropriateness of the measures proposed.

Completion of report

Candidates should use the ‘Candidate report template’ given at Appendix 5 to structure their report. The length of the report should be between 700 and 1000 words and should not simply duplicate the observation sheets. Candidates can consult reference books when preparing the report, but plagiarism will be dealt with as malpractice.
The report should not contain photographs, printed text or any other extraneous material.
The report should be written in such terms that a manager would be able to take reasonable action based on facts. Reports based on unsupported generalities and those that simply reiterate the contents of the observation sheets will be awarded low marks.
Candidates should aim to complete their report in one hour.
If none of the criteria to award marks is met, then zero marks will be awarded.

Marking of report

Candidates are advised to refer to the marking sheet given at Appendix 3 and the marking matrix given at Appendix 6.

Report – Introduction and Executive Summary

Introduction providing an overview of the chosen area (5 marks)
Candidates should start with the details of the inspection, stating where and when the inspection took place. A clear and appropriate description of the chosen area and of the activities occurring in the area should be given.
Executive summary (5 marks)
The executive summary should be written after the candidate has completed the rest of the report but it should be inserted at the beginning of the report. The purpose of the executive summary is to provide a concise overview of the important points arising from the work and summarise the main conclusions and recommendations arising from it.
An executive summary should provide sufficient information to enable a busy manager to make a decision as to whether or not to read the full report and to provide a persuasive case for implementation of recommendations made.

Report – Main findings of the inspection

The main findings of the inspection should form the main body of the report and include the following aspects:
The report should be well structured, the appropriate length and not duplicate observation sheets. The report should be concise, readable and highly selective in terms of action required by management. Candidates should include balanced arguments on why action is needed and explain the effect it would have on the standards of health and safety at the workplace and the possible effects on the business overall as a result.
Quality of interpretation of findings (15 marks)
There should be a logical progression from the hazards outlined on the observation sheets. The key issues should be appropriately selected and discussed, and should not include any hazards not outlined on the observation sheets and does not duplicate the observation sheets.
Identification of possible breaches of legislation and standards (5 marks)
Candidates should be able to identify legislation eg Manual Handling Operations Regulations, standards and conventions listed in the syllabus that may have been infringed eg Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems (ILO-OSH) 2001. Credit will also be given for reference to appropriate local standards.
Candidates must ensure that any legislation, standards or convention referred to is relevant to the area/location inspected and hazards outlined and must demonstrate a clear understanding of the reasons for the breaches. Candidates should identify a minimum of five breaches.
Persuasiveness / conciseness / technical content (10 marks)
The candidate must explain why management need to take action including clear legal, moral and financial arguments. Issues requiring urgent action by management with associated explanations containing convincing arguments why such action is needed should be included. Reference can be made to the list of observations and recommended actions, calling particular attention to any recommendations which could have a high cost in terms of finance, inconvenience or time.
Financial benefits, such as increased productivity, may also accrue from making appropriate changes to safety systems. The possible costs of not taking action should be included.

Report – Conclusions and Recommendations

Clear and concise conclusions which are clearly related to report findings and are effective in convincing management to take action (15 marks)
This section should provide a concise summary of the findings identified in the main body of the candidate’s report to persuade management to take action. The conclusions should not introduce new issues or additional factors.
Recommendations which present realistic actions to improve health and safety in the chosen area (15 marks)
Candidates must include recommendations based upon their conclusions.
Most importantly recommendations must be presented using the recommendations table included at Appendix 5. The recommendations must be realistic, appropriately prioritised and have appropriate resource implications. Candidates are not expected either to know or to estimate actual costs but should demonstrate that they are aware of cost implications. For example, candidates recommending the complete resurfacing of a site roadway because of a small pothole, without commenting on its overall condition, will receive low marks.
If training is recommended as a solution to a problem, candidates should indicate if this is likely to require a few hours of work-based instruction or several days of more costly off-the-job training. It is the assessment of magnitude of the cost that is important, rather than precise figures, eg candidates may refer to the number of worker hours as a measure of cost.
Recommendations must be prioritized. The most pressing issues, those which present the highest risk levels and those that can be done immediately at little or no cost, should be addressed first. Target date should be included, for example, ‘plus one week’ or ‘plus three months’.
If none of the criteria to award marks is met, then zero marks will be awarded.
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COMMAND WORDS FOR NEBOSH IGC – EXAM TIPS

Command word & Definition

Command words  are  important to note while writing the examination.

Identify

– To give reference to an item, which could be its name or title.

NB: normally a word or phrase will be sufficient, provided the reference is clear.

Give

– To provide short, factual answers.

NB: normally a single word, phrase or sentence will be sufficient.

Outline

 – To indicate the principal features or different parts of.

NB: an exhaustive description is not required. What is sought is a brief summary of the major aspects of whatever is stated in the question.

Describe

 – To give a detailed written account of the distinctive features of a subject. The account should be factual, without any attempt to explain.

When describing a subject (or object) a test of sufficient detail would be that another person would be able to visualize what you are describing.

Explain

– To provide an understanding. To make an idea or relationship clear.

NB: this command word is testing the candidate’s ability to know or understand why or how something happens. Is often associated with the words ‘how’ or ‘why’.

Responding to command words in questions

It is important to read the whole question and to understand what the question requires as the command word on its own will need to be reinforced by the remainder of the question.

Many candidates miss out on gaining marks because they do not read the question carefully enough and do not think about their answer thoroughly before writing it down.

Candidates need to think about each question.

• Firstly, What is the command word?

•Furthermore, What do I need to say to gain marks?

•Finally, What is or is not relevant to the question?

In many cases a brief answer plan is an essential aid to ensuring that answers are well thought out and structured.

NEBOSH applies a ‘positive marking’ approach; that is, marks are awarded for correct material in candidates’ answers, rather than being deducted for incorrect or missing material.

In order to give further direction as to the detail of information required by the command word in a question, examples are given below both for general knowledge and for the IGC1 syllabus.

Identify

Applying identify to a non-syllabus related common subject:

Q1. Identify FOUR kitchen appliances.

Q2. Identify FOUR types of bicycle.

Sufficient answers would include:

A1. Toaster

Electric kettle

Microwave cooker

Dishwasher

A2. Mountain bike

Racing bike

Penny-farthing

Tandem

Note that giving only one or two word answers provides a clear reference and therefore is sufficient to satisfy an identify question.

Applying identify to syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would include:

Identify FOUR hazards associated with excavations.

Collapse of the sides

Water ingress

Falling materials

Underground services

Identify FOUR mechanical hazards associated with machinery.

Entanglement

Drawing in and trapping

Friction or abrasion

Stabbing or puncture

Identify FOUR types of safety sign.

Prohibition signs

Warning signs

Mandatory signs

Emergency or safe condition signs

Again, answers are limited to a brief phrase or in some cases just two words but do give clear reference.

Outline

To gain the marks for the outline example questions below, the same breadth of answer is required as for an identify answer, but now, additional information will be required to satisfy the depth of an outline.

Applying outline to the same non-syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would include:

Outline FOUR kitchen appliances.

Toaster

• Accommodates slices of bread, ejects as toast when ready.

Electric kettle

• 1 to 2 litre capacity, boils water. Can be cordless.

Microwave cooker

Heats food rapidly using short wavelength radio waves.

Dishwasher

• Dirty tableware placed in baskets. Mixture of high pressure water and detergent automatically cleans.

Outline FOUR types of bicycle.

Mountain bike

• Robust bicycle with deep tread tyres, suspension and several gear choices.

Racing bike

• Lightweight frame with drop handlebars and maybe fixed gearing.

Penny-farthing

• Vintage device with very large front wheel and small rear wheel.

Tandem

• Bicycle designed for two people with two seats and two sets of pedals.

Applying outline to the same syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would include:

Outline FOUR hazards associated with excavations.

Collapse of the sides

• Unsupported trench or incorrect angle of the sides.

Water ingress

• Through heavy rain or burst water main.

Falling materials

• Spoil dug from excavation or materials and tools stored at ground level could fall in.

Underground services

• Contact or rupturing of electricity, gas or water utilities.

Outline FOUR mechanical hazards associated with machinery.

Entanglement

• On rotating parts.

Drawing in and trapping

• Between counter rotation rollers, or pulley belts and wheels.

Friction or abrasion

• Contact with fast moving surfaces.

Stabbing or puncture

• From ejected objects or flying objects.

Outline FOUR types of safety sign.

Prohibition signs

• Circular with red border, red diagonal bar and black symbol.

Warning signs

Triangular, yellow background, black border and symbol.

Mandatory signs

• Circular, blue background, white border and white symbol.

Emergency or safe condition signs

• Rectangular, green background, white border and white symbol.

Again, the identify answer (shown in bold) gives the breadth required and the additional information given in the bullet point satisfies the required depth for an outline.

Describe

Applying describe to the non-syllabus subjects:

Sufficient answers would be:

Describe a microwave cooker.

An oblong box shaped object, approximately 30cm tall, 30cm deep and 60cm long. There is a single hinged door at the front, typically see through. The door opens outwards and inside there is a space to place a plate or dish and a microwave transmitter is located above. Outside, on the front there will be normally two controls to set the power and cooking time.

Describe a penny-farthing bicycle.

A manually propelled vintage bicycle consisting of a very large wheel at the front and a much smaller wheel at the back. The wheels are connected by a frame that supports a seat above the front wheel and handlebars to steer. Pedals are connected directly to the centre of the front wheel.

Applying describe to a syllabus subject:

Describe the mechanical hazards associated with abench grinder.

An entanglement hazard would be associated with the rotating spindle that the abrasive wheel is mounted on. Drawing in and trapping is associated with the gap between the tool rest and the rotating abrasive wheel. Friction or abrasion hazards would be associated with the surface of the rotating abrasive wheel and stabbing or puncture hazards could be created by flying fragments or pieces of ejected broken wheel.

In all of the describe answers above, no attempt is made to explain how a microwave cooker heats food, why the front wheel of a penny-farthing is so much larger than the rear wheel or how a person could be injured using an abrasive wheel.

Explain

Applying explain to a non-syllabus subject:

Sufficient answers would include:

Explain how a microwave cooker heats up food.

The frequency of microwaves used in a microwave cooker is sufficient to cause water molecules in food to vibrate. Vibrating molecules hit other water molecules and put them into the same vibration and therefore this vibration of molecules is converted into heat.

Explain why there is a very large front wheel on a penny-farthing.

By having a large front wheel, the peripheral (rim speed) of the wheel is much faster than the rotation of the pedals at the centre. This results in faster forward speed per pedal rotation. Also a larger wheel is more suitable for riding on cobbled streets or rough ground.

Applying explain to a syllabus subject:

Explain how sensitive protective equipment (trip device) can reduce the risk of contact with moving parts of machinery.

Sensitive protective equipment is designed to identify the presence of a person or body part within the danger zone of machinery. Examples of such devices include pressure mats and light beams that are connected to the machine controls and would stop the machine rapidly should a person or body part be detected.

Give

Applying give to a non-syllabus subject:

Identify FOUR European cities AND give an example of a tourist attraction in EACH.

London – eg Buckingham Palace

Paris – eg Eiffel Tower

Pisa – eg Leaning Tower

Rome – eg Colosseum

Applying give to a syllabus subject:

Identify FOUR types of safety sign AND give an examplein EACH case.

Prohibition signs – eg No smoking

Warning signs – eg Caution hot surface

Mandatory signs – eg Wear ear protection

Emergency or safe condition signs – eg first-aid box

ASHEI

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Hot Weather Safety

Hot Weather Safety

Hot weather safety is one of the major aspects in safety

 

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VIOLENCE in WORKPLACE

What is workplace violence?

VIOLENCE in WORKPLACE  is violence or the threat of violence against workers.

It can occur at or outside the workplace and can range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and homicide, one of the leading causes of job-related deaths. However it manifests itself, workplace violence is a growing concern for employers and employees nationwide.

Who is vulnerable?

2 million workers are victims of workplace violence each year. Workplace violence can strike anywhere, and no one is immune. Some workers, however, are at increased risk. Among them are workers who exchange money with the public; deliver passengers, goods, or services; or work alone or in small groups, during late night or early morning hours, in high-crime areas, or in community settings and homes where they have extensive contact with the public.

This group includes health-care and social service workers such as visiting nurses, psychiatric evaluators, and probation officers; community workers such as gas and water utility employees, phone and cable TV installers, and letter carriers; retail workers; and taxi drivers.

What can these employers do to help protect these employees?

The best protection employers can offer is to establish a zero-tolerance policy toward workplace violence against or by their employees. The employer should establish a workplace violence prevention program or incorporate the information into an existing accident prevention program, employee handbook, or manual of standard operating procedures. It is critical to ensure that all employees know the policy and understand that all claims of workplace violence will be investigated and remedied promptly.

In addition, employers can offer additional protections such as the following:

Provide safety education for employees so they know what conduct is not acceptable,what to do if they witness or are subjected to workplace violence, and how to protect themselves.

Secure the workplace. Where appropriate to the business, install video surveillance, extra lighting, and alarm systems and minimize access by outsiders through identification badges, electronic keys, and guards.

Provide drop safes to limit the amount of cash on hand. Keep a minimal amount of cash in registers during evenings and latenight hours.

Equip field staff with cellular phones and hand-held alarms or noise devices, and require them to prepare a daily work plan and keep a contact person informed of their location throughout the day. Keep employer provided vehicles properly maintained.

Instruct employees not to enter any location where they feel unsafe. Introduce a “buddy system” or provide an escort service or police assistance in potentially dangerous situations or at night.

Develop policies and procedures covering visits by home health-care providers. Address the conduct of home visits, the presence of others in the home during visits, and the worker’s right to refuse to provide services in a clearly hazardous situation.

How can the employees protect themselves?

Nothing can guarantee that an employee will not become a victim of workplace violence. These steps, however, can help reduce the odds:

Learn how to recognize, avoid, or diffuse potentially violent situations by attending personal safety training programs.

Alert supervisors to any concerns about safety or security and report all incidents immediately in writing.

Avoid traveling alone into unfamiliar locations or situations whenever possible.

Carry only minimal money and required identification into community settings.

What should employers do following an incident of workplace violence?

Encourage employees to report and log all incidents and threats of workplace violence.

Provide prompt medical evaluation and treatment after the incident.

Report violent incidents to the local police promptly.

Inform victims of their legal right to prosecute perpetrators.

Discuss the circumstances of the incident with staff members. Encourage employees to share information about ways to avoid similar situations in the future.

Offer stress debriefing sessions and post traumatic counseling services to help workers recover from a violent incident.

Investigate all violent incidents and threats, monitor trends in violent incidents by type or circumstance, and institute corrective actions.

Discuss changes in the program during regular employee meetings.

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SILICA DUST

Silica

Silica dust, often referred to as quartz, is a very common mineral. It is found in many materials common on construction sites, including soil, sand, concrete, masonry, rock, granite, and landscaping materials.

The dust created by cutting, grinding, drilling or otherwise disturbing these materials can contain crystalline silica particles.

These dust particles are very small. You cannot see them. This reparable silica dust causes lung disease and lung cancer. It only takes a very small amount of airborne silica dust to create a health hazard.

HAZARDS OF SILICA DUST

Crystalline silica is a common mineral in the earth’s crust, and is found in many types of rock including sand, quartz, and granite. Silica is present in both work and non-work environments, and exposure to crystalline silica dust has long been known to cause a disease called silicosis. When you inhale crystalline silica the lung tissue reacts by developing fibrous tissue around trapped silica particles. This condition of the lung is called silicosis.

Due to the extensive use of concrete and masonry products in buildings today, construction workers have a potential exposure to crystalline silica. Operations such as dumping of rock, jack hammering, abrasive blasting, sawing, drilling or demolition of concrete and masonry structures are some of the activities that could produce this exposure.

Silica sand or other substances containing more than 1% crystalline silica should never be used as abrasive blasting materials. Where silica exceeds 1% of the content, less hazardous materials should be substituted. In addition, always follow safe work practices when there is possible exposure to silica dust.

What are the symptoms of silicosis?

Silicosis is classified into three types: chronic/classic, accelerated, and acute. Chronic/classic silicosis, the most common, occurs after 15–20 years of moderate to low exposures to repairable crystalline silica.

Symptoms associated with chronic silicosis may or may not be obvious; therefore, workers need to have a chest x-ray to determine if there is lung damage. As the disease progresses, the worker may experience shortness of breath upon exercising and have clinical signs of poor oxygen/carbon dioxide exchange. In the later stages, the worker may experience fatigue, extreme shortness of breath, chest pain, or respiratory failure. Accelerated silicosis can occur after 5–10 years of high exposures to reparable crystalline silica. Symptoms include severe shortness of breath, weakness, and weight loss. The onset of symptoms takes longer than in acute silicosis.

Acute silicosis occurs after a few months or as long as 2 years following exposures to extremely high concentrations of repairable crystalline silica. Symptoms of acute silicosis include severe disabling shortness of breath, weakness, and weight loss, which often leads to death.

Where are general industry employees exposed to crystalline silica dust?

The most severe exposures to crystalline silica result from abrasive blasting, which is done to clean and smooth irregularities from molds, jewelry, and foundry castings, finish tombstones, etch or frost glass, or remove paint, oils, rust, or dirt form objects needing to be repainted or treated. Other exposures to silica dust occur in cement and brick manufacturing, asphalt pavement manufacturing, china and ceramic manufacturing and the tool and die, steel and foundry industries.

Crystalline silica is used in manufacturing, household abrasives, adhesives, paints, soaps, and glass. Additionally, crystalline silica exposures occur in the maintenance, repair and replacement of refractory brick furnace linings. In the maritime industry, shipyard employees are exposed to silica primarily in abrasive blasting operations to remove paint and clean and prepare steel hulls, bulkheads, decks, and tanks for paints and coatings.

What can employers/employees do to protect against exposures to crystalline silica?

■ Replace crystalline silica materials with safer substitutes, whenever possible.

■ Provide engineering or administrative controls, where feasible, such as local exhaust ventilation, and blasting cabinets. Where necessary to reduce exposures below the PEL, use protective equipment or other protective measures.

■ Use all available work practices to control dust exposures, such as water sprays.

■ Wear only a N95 NIOSH certified respirator, if respirator protection is required. Do not alter the respirator. Do not wear a tight-fitting respirator with a beard or mustache that prevents a good seal between the respirator and the face.

■ Wear only a Type CE abrasive-blast supplied-air respirator for abrasive blasting.

■ Wear disposable or washable work clothes and shower if facilities are available. Vacuum the dust from your clothes or change into clean clothing before leaving the work site.

■ Participate in training, exposure monitoring, and health screening and surveillance programs to monitor any adverse health effects caused by crystalline silica exposures.

■ Be aware of the operations and job tasks creating crystalline silica exposures in your workplace environment and know how to protect yourself.

■ Be aware of the health hazards related to exposures to crystalline silica. Smoking adds to the lung damage caused by silica exposures.

■ Do not eat, drink, smoke, or apply cosmetics in areas where crystalline silica dust is present. Wash your hands and face outside of dusty areas before performing any of these activities.

■ Remember: If it’s silica, it’s not just dust.

ASHEI

1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025

Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385

info@asheinstitute.com

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Safety Glasses Work

Safety Glasses Work

Eye injuries are 100 percent preventable.

Your eyes are very delicate, made of thin tissues that can’t take much damage. You can’t blink fast enough to prevent an injury. Significant surgeries are required when serious damage occurs. Shavings, grindings and other particles can fly at high velocities into the eye.

1. Safety glasses are a barrier between your eyes and flying objects.

2. If there is ANY CHANCE of a flying object, wear protective eyewear.

3. Use ANSI-approved safety glasses.

4. Wear eye protection when grinding, buffing, cutting, sawing, chipping and using chemicals.

5. Bad eye injuries will require significant surgery, and at least some loss of vision will most likely result.

1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025

Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385

info@asheinstitute.com

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Atmospheric Testing in Confined Space

Atmospheric Testing in Confined Space

Atmospheric testing is required for two distinct purposes: evaluation of the hazards of the permit space and verification that acceptable conditions exist for entry into that space.

A confined space is one that is large enough to enter and perform assigned work in; it has limited or restricted ways to enter or exit the space; and it was not designed to be occupied continuously by a worker.

Evaluation testing

The atmosphere within a confined space must be tested using equipment that is designed to detect the chemicals that may be present at levels that are well below the defined exposure limits. Evaluation testing is done to:

• determine what chemical hazards are or may become present in the space’s atmosphere, and

• identify what steps must be followed and what conditions must be met to ensure that atmospheric conditions are safe for a worker to enter the space.

The testing results and the decisions about what steps must be followed before entry must be evaluated by, or reviewed by, a technically qualified professional

The technically qualified professional must consider all of the serious hazards in his/her evaluation or review.

A permit space is a confined space that has one or more of the following features: it has or may contain a hazardous atmosphere; it contains a material that can engulf a person who enters; it has an inside design that could trap or asphyxiate a person who enters (inwardly converging walls, or a floor that slopes downward to a smaller section); or it has any other serious safety or health hazards.

Verification Testing

Before a permit space that may have a hazardous atmosphere can be entered, the atmosphere must be tested using the steps identified on the permit (developed during evaluation testing).

Verification testing is done to make sure that the chemical hazards that may be present are below the levels necessary for safe entry, and that they meet the conditions identified on the permit. Test the atmosphere in the following order: (1) for oxygen, (2) for combustible gases, and then (3) for toxic gases and vapors.2 The testing results — the actual test concentrations — must be recorded on the permit near the levels identified for safe entry.

Duration of Testing

For each test required on the permit, you must allow enough time for the air from the space to be drawn into the equipment and for the sensor (or other detection device) to react to the chemical if it is present. This is considered the “minimum response time” and it will be noted by the manufacturer in the operator’s manual.

Be aware that you will need to add time to this “minimum response time” if you have attached hosing or a probe extension to the inlet. The additional time is needed to allow the air from the different depths of the space to be pulled into the equipment inlet.

Testing Conditions in Spaces that May Have Layered Atmospheres

For permit spaces that are deep or have areas leading away from the entry point, the atmosphere may be layered or may be different in remote areas. For these spaces, testing must be done in the area surrounding the worker, which is considered four (4) feet in the direction of travel and to each side. If a sample probe is used to do the testing,then the worker must move slowly enough so that testing is completed, keeping the equipment “response time” in mind, before he/she moves into the new area.

Retesting the Space During Entry or Before Re-Entry

Test the permit space routinely to make sure that the atmospheric conditions continue to be safe for entry.

ASHEI

1st Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aiswarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom, 682025

Reach us on 9745126655, 8592859385

info@asheinstitute.com

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nebosh igc
NEBOSH Health and Safety at Work Qualification

NEBOSH Health and Safety at Work Qualification

Health and Safety at Work Qualification

A perfect introduction to health and safety.
This introductory qualification will help improve the safety culture in your organisation, by equipping your workforce to identify and deal with hazards at work helping to reduce accidents and achieving cost savings for the business.
The qualification is designed to meet the needs of an international audience. There is no content on UK law. The multiple choice assessment is currently available in English, Arabic, Mandarin, French, European Spanish and Russian.
This qualification is an ideal first step towards other higher level NEBOSH qualifications including NEBOSH’s International General Certificate and National General Certificate.

What kind of people take the NEBOSH Health and Safety at Work qualification?
This introductory qualification is aimed at anyone who needs to understand the principles of health and safety as part of their job.
The typical people who would benefit from this qualification include:
• Team leaders and supervisors
• HR professionals
• Facilities managers
• Those working with young people in a training environment.
This qualification has been accredited and credit rated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) and sits in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF).

3 Days course

Its a level 2 examination of NEBOSH. Exam conducted by NEBOSH at our institute, you have to register 1 month before the exam date.

NEXT EXAM ON JULY 27 @ ASHEI. REGISTRATION OPEN!!!

ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|BSC|MFA|OHSAS|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 94 476096 17, 85 928593 85
Email : info@asheinstitute.com, ashei.neena@gmail.com
Web :www.asheinstitute.com

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IOSH courses in kerala
International Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health

 International Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health

ASHE Institute, Kochi Proudly announce IDIPOSH certification for OHS professionals
British Safety Council have been a trusted leader in health, safety and environmental management. They have educated millions of workers and made hundreds of thousands of workplaces healthier and safer for everyone. British Safety Council do this by sharing information, supporting organisations as they change, advising, educating and campaigning for effective legislation.
Workplace there are multiple hazards and can harm workers, the broader environment or both, requiring different levels of risk management. They help you to reduce risks sensibly, making workplaces healthier and safer for everyone and improving long-term business performance. British Safety Council has changed the world of work for the better and we’ll never stop, because excellent health, safety and environmental management is good for your people and good for your business.
The International Diploma focuses on embedding health and safety into an organisation’s culture and highlights the key role of communication in securing senior management commitment.

This Course is Suitable For?  Health and safety professionals who are wanting to advance their professional career or undertake further postgraduate study.

Is This Qualification Recognised?
This qualification is also accepted by the International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (www.iirsm.org) as meeting their requirements for full membership (MIIRSM). United Kingdom professional health and safety bodies have a growing international reputation with a number of international branches being formed.
Meets the academic requirement for graduate membership of IOSH (Grad IOSH). Following the successful completion of a period of initial professional development, a graduate member may apply for chartered status (CMIOSH).

 Benefits of the Course.
On successful completion of the qualification, the Diploma holder may apply for Graduate member (Grad IOSH) of the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), the major UK professional body in the field (www.iosh.co.uk). This is the first step to becoming a Chartered Safety and Health Practitioner as a Chartered Member of IOSH (CMIOSH).
Holders of the British Safety Council International Diploma in Occupational Health and Safety may use the designatory letters “IDipOSH” after their name. The British Safety Council International Diploma is a prestigious and demanding professional qualification for those wanting to advance their career in occupational health and safety.IDipOSH is recognised around the world as the global standard for health and safety professionals. It aims to provide the knowledge and understanding that strengthen performance of a Health and Safety Professional.
Entry Requirement
There are no specific entry requirements for this qualification, however, it is highly recommended to complete NEBOSH International General Certificate or equivalent to Level 3 before undertaking the NEBOSH International Diploma.
Fresher’s – Core Engineering graduates, Science graduates & polytechnic diploma holders with NEBOSH General Certificate or equivalent to Level 3.Good standard of written English communication is required since the examinations are held in English.

Course Content
The International Diploma is divided into Three units, each of which is assessed separately:

  • Unit 1: Principles of health and safety Management.
  • Unit 2: Safeguarding People’s Health in the Workplace.
  • Unit 3: Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture in the Workplace.

Exam
The International Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health exam is assessed in Three units:
The Unit 1: Principles Health and Safety Management – 3 Hrs written exam.

  • .The Unit 2: Safeguarding People’s Health in the Workplace – 2.5 Hrs written exam and 5000 words assignment.
  • The Unit 3: Promoting a Positive Health and Safety Culture in the Workplace – 10,000 words Assignment only.
  • All the Candidate scripts are marked by external examiners appointed by British Safety Council.

Certification
Successfully completing the International Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health leads to Graduate Membership of IOSH. This is the first step to becoming a Chartered Health and Safety Practitioner as a Chartered Member of IOSH (CMIOSH)

Results and certificates issued within 30 working days.

Contact Us:

For Details info@asheinstitute.com, www.asheinstitute.com   04842343590, 9745126655, 8606108000

 

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best training institute for safety courses in kerala
SAFETY VACANCY in Kuwait

SAFETY VACANCY

Safety Vacancy  kuwait as received on 09-06-2017
DESIGNATION : FIRE WATCHER (For EQUATE Shutdown 2-3 Months)
QUALIFICATION : Dip. In Fire & Safety
EXPERIENCE : 2-5 yrs
PLACE : Kuwait
Contact Number: 9791801375
Interview on 11th June 2017 @ Kochi

SAFETY VACANCY in Kuwait

BSC Level 6 IDIP in OSH @ ASHEI…
Class starts on September 25th
Exam on October 13 & 14
Registration open now!!!
For further details and registration call in: 9447609617, 8606108000
www.asheinstitute.com

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TBT – TWO WHEEL HAND TRUCK

TBT – TWO WHEEL HAND TRUCK

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ISO 14001 ems auditor courses in kerala
H2S Awareness Training @ ASHEI

BASIC H2S AWARENESS and EBA @ Ashei

H2S Awareness Training

Course Overview

ASHE Institute is an accredited organisation to IADC (USA) for its Rigpass, only provider in Kerala.
H2S Awareness training is four-hour Basic H2S Training course conducted and certified by ASHEI. Aimed at all personnel who risk exposure to hydrogen sulphide contamination at work. The training covers the detection and measurement of the flammable gas, plus the correct emergency response to an H2S leak. Basic H2S Training certification should be revalidated every two years.
This training helps fulfill the training requirements of OSHA 29 CFR 1910 and 1926, ANSI Z390.1, Accepted Practices for Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Training Programs, and other regulatory standards.

 

Course Structure

The course includes theoretical input, demonstrations and practical exercises coupled with a written examination for delegates to demonstrate an acceptable level of competence.

 

Course Content

The syllabus focuses on:
• Actions to be taken in the event of an alarm
• Common definitions: PPM, WEL
• How H2S is detected and the use of onsite and personnel detection equipment
• H2S gas, it’s common name where it can be ordinarily found
• Measurement and the WEL of H2S
• Physical properties and characteristics of H2S
• Physiological effects of exposure to H2S
• Role of the emergency response teams in an H2S emergency
• Types of respiratory equipment available including escape breathing apparatus and self-contained breathing apparatus
• Importance of a correct facemask fit

 

Course Duration : 4 hours

Prerequisites : None.

Target Audience : This course is intended for personnel working in an environment that could become contaminated by H2S gas.

Certification : ASHEI – approved certification will be issued on successful completion of the course.

Revalidation : Every two years

Items to bring : Photographic ID

For further details call on : 9447609617, 8606108000
www.asheinstitute.com

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BSC level 6 international diploma course in kerala
WhatsApp Group – Safety First Duty Next…….. Join Now

Join here for our WhatsApp Group

Safety First Duty Next” for Safety Jobs and Other Safety News……………..

Safety First Duty Next

Message on : 8593913939 

or 

Goto Link :   https://chat.whatsapp.com/5gNAVb07lnaBZVSaZKoMpK

Crash courses for Engineering candidates..
Join ASHEI… Be a certified Safety Professional.
Registration going on for May batch. Few seats available. Last days……………………..
NEBOSH, IOSH, IADC RIGPASS, OSH DIPLOMA, CIEH, OHSAS, BSE LEVEL 6 etc…

Safety First Duty Next
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|CIEH|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium,
Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 9447609617
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com
mail: info.ashei@gmail.com

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best training institute for safety courses in kerala
Safety Officer Vacancy

SAFETY OFFICER @ Haryana
Qualification : Dip. In Safety 2-3 yrs experience
Recruiter Name: Mr. Hari Nair

REGISTRATION GOING ON FOR MAY BATCH.
FEW SEATS AVAILABLE. LAST DAYS………………………………
BSC LEVEL 6 & 3 | NEBOSH | IOSH | IADC RIGPASS | OSH DIPLOMA | CIEH | OHSAS etc…
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|CIEH|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590 Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 9447609617
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com
mail: info.ashei@gmail.com , ashei.neena@gmail.com
Slogan of the Month
A Great Practice is To Concentrate on the task(s) at hand

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BSC level 6 international diploma course in kerala
HSE Awareness Training Package

NEBOSH Health and Safety at Work Qualification

HSE Awareness training for fresher’s

A perfect introduction to health and safety. This introductory qualification will help improve the safety culture in your organisation, by equipping your workforce to identify and deal with hazards at work helping to reduce accidents and achieving cost savings for the business. The qualification is designed to meet the needs of an international audience. There is no content on UK law. The multiple choice assessment is currently available in English, Arabic, Mandarin, French, European Spanish and Russian.

This qualification is an ideal first step towards other higher level NEBOSH qualifications including NEBOSH’s International General Certificate and National General Certificate.

What kind of people take the NEBOSH Health and Safety at Work qualification?

This introductory qualification is aimed at anyone who needs to understand the principles of health and safety as part of their job. The typical people who would benefit from this qualification include:

  • Team leaders and supervisors
  • HR professionals
  • Facilities managers
  • Those working with young people in a training environment.

This qualification has been accredited and credit rated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) and sits in the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF).

3 Days course

Its a level 2 examination of NEBOSH. Exam conducted by NEBOSH at our institute, you have to register 1 month before the exam date.Registration fee is 10000/-

 

HSE Awareness training  @ASHE Institute

Environment Health Safety Training Institute

First Floor, Suprans Arcade,

Aishwarya Road, Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium,

Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam 682 025

REGISTRATION GOING ON FOR  MAY BATCH. FEW SEATS AVAILABLE. LAST DAYS………………………………
BSC LEVEL 6 & 3 | NEBOSH | IOSH | IADC RIGPASS | OSH DIPLOMA | CIEH | OHSAS etc…
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|CIEH|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium, Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 9447609617
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com
mail: info.ashei@gmail.com, ashei.neena@gmail.com

A Great Practice is To Concentrate on the task(s) at hand
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Maintenance Shop Safety Rules

Maintenance Shop Safety

Maintenance Shop Safety Rules

 Employees must wear their seat belts when driving on company business.
 Report to work free from the aftereffects of drugs or alcohol.
 Horseplay is not permitted.
 Report maintenance needs or hazards before the end of your work shift.
 Report incidents or injuries before the end of your work shift.
 Lock and tag machines that are being serviced.
 Block and lock machines that could fall during service or maintenance.
 Control hydraulic or mechanical energy that could suddenly release during maintenance.
 Use jack stands when working beneath machines.
 Wear protective eyewear whenever exposed to flying objects or dusts.
 Keep tongue guards and tool rests properly adjusted on bench grinders.
 Do not remove shields or guards provided on shop machinery.
 To reach items, use a proper foot stool or ladder and never stand on chairs or machines.
 Material safety data sheets must be stored and made available for chemicals used on a regular basis.
 Do not run in the work area.
 Pick up trip hazards when they are discovered.
 Clean up slip hazards once discovered.

 

 Do not smoke near chemical storage or forklift charging or refueling stations.
 Do not smoke during any maintenance activities.
 Turn off oxy-acetylene torches when not in use.
 Remove air or torch hoses that are damaged.
 Do not use damaged, worn, kinked extension cords.
 Remove extension cords that are damaged.
 To prevent fire keep oily rags and towels in approved metal safety hampers.
 Keep fire exits clear, unblocked and unlocked.
 Fire exit and emergency lighting should be lit and battery backups should function.
 Keep fire extinguishers and fire alarm pull stations clear.
 Keep emergency eyewash stations clear.
 Clean up spills of liquids, lubricants or water.
 Do not clean parts with gasoline. Use approved parts cleaning fluids and protective gloves.
 Know severe weather shelter locations within the building.
 Get help to team lift heavy objects like supplies, components or tools.
 Use pallet jacks, dollies or carts to move heavy objects.

Click to watch a video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhprhgX7XMo

IMG_8296 - Copy

Join ASHEI… Be a certified Safety Professional.
Registration going on for May batch. Few seats available.
NEBOSH, IOSH, IADC RIGPASS, OSH DIPLOMA, CIEH, OHSAS, BSE LEVEL 6 etc…
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|CIEH|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium,
Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 9447609617
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com

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Rolling Ladder Safety

Rolling Ladder Safety

Rolling ladders and stairways are found in many warehouses, retail outlets and storage
facilities. Drivers of trucks also use rolling ladders in fire stations and truck stops to clean
windshields and service the tops of their trucks. Rolling ladders are made of lightweight
tubular steel that is welded to large steps, usually made of expanded steel treads. Rolling
ladders vary in height from short, two-step models to tall, twelve foot models. Review
these safety tips:

BACKGROUND
Each year , accidents involving ladders cause an estimated 300 deaths and 130,000 injuries
requiring emergency medical attention.
LADDER ACCIDENTS
Ladder accidents usually are caused by improper selection, care or use, not by manufacturing defects.
Some of the more common hazards involving ladders, such as instability, electrical shock, and falls,
can be predicted and prevented.  Prevention requires proper planning, correct ladder
selection, good work procedures and adequate ladder maintenance.

Click to watch a video :  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCNiNmP2l2I
LADDER SAFETY BASICS
Survey the area for overhead power lines before
setting up and climbing ladders.
Inspect ladders before climbing.
Never use a damaged or unsafe ladder.
Verify ladder capacity before climbing.
Don’t use them for anything other than the job
they’re intended to do.
Never stand on the top two steps of a stepladder,
and don’t use a step ladder as a straight ladder.
Raise extension ladders 3 feet (3 or 4 rungs) over the
landing area.
Tie off / secure extension ladders to prevent tip over
or kick out.

ROLLING LADDER SAFETY
Keep rolling ladders in good mechanical condition.
Rolling ladders that are stored outside should be protected from rain, snow and ice.
Rolling ladders that are stored outside should be inspected regularly for rust and corrosion.
Inspect rolling ladders before use.
Rolling ladders that have been damaged or “sprung” must be removed from service.
Rolling ladders that have missing rubber “feet” should have them replaced.
Rolling ladders should be climbed facing the ladder – not facing outward.
Climb rolling ladders using 3-point contact – do not carry loads that are too bulky or heavy.
Do not over reach – could cause ladder to tip.
Do not stand on the hand rails.
Do not move an occupied ladder.
Never stand with one foot on the ladder and the other on an object such as shelving.
Do not set up rolling ladders in areas where doors could swing open into the ladder.
Avoid setting up rolling ladders in direct proximity to forklift or vehicle traffic.
Do not tamper with or modify ladders.
Remove tools, equipment or boxes before moving a rolling ladder.
Use the step brake / lock if equipped.
Consider tying off / securing the rolling ladder if tipping is a concern.
Do not attempt to gain additional height by standing on boxes or buckets atop rolling ladder platforms.
Submit ladder maintenance requests / safety concerns in writing.

Click to watch a video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-2eEdyIGR0

IMG_8285

Join ASHEI… Be a certified Safety Professional.
Registration going on for May batch. Few seats available.
NEBOSH, IOSH, IADC RIGPASS, OSH DIPLOMA, CIEH, OHSAS, BSE LEVEL 6 etc…
RESERVE YOUR SEAT AND BECOME A SAFETY PROFESSIONAL….
ASHEI
An ISO 9001:2008 Certified – Environment Health and Safety Training Institute
IOSH|NEBOSH|CIEH|IADC Rigpass Accredited center @ Kochi
First Floor, Suprans Arcade, Aishwarya Road,
Opposite to Kaloor International Stadium,
Palarivattom(PO), Ernakulam – 682 025
Phone : 0091 484 2343590
Mob : 91 85 928593 85 , 9447609617
Web:-www.asheinstitute.com

 

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GC3 Tips

GC3 GUIDANCE

GC3 Tips

http://www.nebosh.org.uk/fileupload/upload/GC3%20Guidance%20and%20information%20for%20accredited%20course%20providers%20and%20candidates%20v3%200116%20%28060116%20rew%292322016191210.pdf

GC3 Tips from expert tutors

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WORKPLACE GASES

Gas and the workplace

The word ‘gas’ can be used to describe the physical state of many substances. While a number of gases have very specific safety requirements, this guidance relates to the use of gas as a fuel within the workplace.

Gas is commonly used in the workplace for heating the work environment and water supplies, cooking and for processing products.

The gas itself can come from a number of sources including natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and methane. The risks of explosion, poisoning, etc. are similar for all.

Gas can be supplied either piped into the premises from the mains supply or a storage tank, or in small cylinders used close to the appliance with a flexible hose connection.

The risks of using gas

When gas does not burn properly, or is used in an area without adequate ventilation, it produces excess carbon monoxide (CO) – a colourless, odourless gas. This can happen regardless of the type of gas being burned, whether from bottles or from a mains supply.

When inhaled, carbon monoxide binds with the haemoglobin in the blood. This reduces the blood’s ability to carry oxygen, starving the body of oxygen and poisoning it.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include tiredness, drowsiness, headaches, nausea and chest and stomach pains.

In extreme cases, carbon monoxide poisoning can kill within a matter of hours.

There is a risk of carbon monoxide poisoning:

  • if there is inadequate ventilation in the room where the appliance is located
  • if the flue or chimney is blocked and cannot vent the system properly
  • if the appliance has not been regularly maintained by a competent person
  • if you use an inexperienced engineer not registered with the Gas safe registered engineers.

Gas safe registered engineers

The Gas Safe Register replaced the Council of Registered Gas Installers as the UK body that certifies gas engineers as being competent to install and maintain gas systems and appliances.

Registration is a legal requirement for anyone installing or repairing domestic gas fittings or appliances.

Different types of appliances need different knowledge. Make sure that the engineer is qualified to work on the correct type of equipment (see the back of their registration card). For example, some engineers servicing gas-fired heating systems may not be qualified to service gas catering equipment.

Always ask to see the engineer’s registration card. The card contains a photograph of the employee, their trading title, their registration number and the expiry date of the card.

The back of the card gives details of the types of gas work that they can carry out. If necessary, the Gas Safe Register can provide evidence of registration and confirmation that any certificate of registration is valid. The Gas Safe Register website lists registered installers across the UK, their contact details and areas of expertise.

Basic gas safety

To help reduce the risks presented by use of gas in the workplace:

  • have new gas equipment supplied and fitted by a Gas safe registered engineers
  • have all gas appliances serviced regularly by a Gas Safe Register engineer, in line with the manufacturers’ instructions
  • keep the areas around external flue outlets clear of vegetation, etc. to make sure that combustion gases can be effectively removed
  • ensure there is an adequate airflow around gas appliances.

Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) safety

LPG can refer to commercial propane or butane. LPG Autogas (LPGA) is a mixture of these two gases used as a vehicle fuel.

Additional precautions are required when using LPG:

  • ensure adequate ventilation is available in the area where the gas is being stored and used, particularly at low level, since LPG is heavier than air
  • have LPG appliances maintained by an engineer qualified to examine such equipment
  • for mobile vehicles, make sure that the gas canister is secured and cannot be tampered with by vandals, etc.
  • try to store as few gas cylinders as possible, arranging for more frequent deliveries where necessary, since storage facilities must meet certain safety standards
  • make sure that gas storage facilities meet the standards laid down in The LPG Association Guidance (see further information).

When storing LPG, the LPG Association stipulates that:

  • the storage area is secured against attack from vandals, etc.
  • warning signage is in place to show the hazards associated with LPG
  • cylinders are stored in an upright position (unless their labelling indicates that they can be stored otherwise)
  • there is clear access to all cylinders
  • fire fighting facilities are available
  • the store and its surroundings are kept free of flammable sources and combustible materials including vegetation
  • the storage area is located away from open drains.

(Code of Practice 7 – Storage of Full and Empty LPG Cylinders and Cartridges, The Liquid Petroleum Gas Association, 2004)

Gas suppliers can often provide guidance on this subject.

Installation and maintenance records for gas work

Detailed records should be kept of any maintenance work carried out on gas pipe work, appliances and/or flues.

Engineers will issue certificates for any work they carry out.

If the terms of the business premises’ lease state that the landlord is responsible for maintaining the gas system, ask to see copies of the maintenance records to make sure that they have been carried out properly and that any necessary repairs have been made.

Carbon monoxide detectors

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odourless and invisible gas that can kill within hours if inhaled. It is produced when methane, propane, LPG and other gases burn incompletely because of poor appliance maintenance or lack of ventilation.

For extra safety, install a carbon monoxide detector and alarm system anywhere gas is burned.

Make sure that the alarm meets safety standards BS 7860 or BS EN 50291, has a Kite mark and is sited in line with the manufacturer’s guidance.

Make sure the detector is tested regularly.

CO detectors are safety devices and are not a substitute for basic safety precautions and regular maintenance by a Corgi registered engineer.

 

 

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RIG AND PLATFORM TYPES

OFFSHORE OIL RIG AND PLATFORM TYPES

RIG AND PLATFORM TYPES

Different types of offshore oil rigs and platforms are used depending on the offshore oil/gas field water-depth and situation. Rigs are used for the drilling of the wells and platforms are installed in the field for extracting oil/gas operation. Main types of rigs and platforms are briefly explained as follows: Drilling for natural oil/gas offshore, in some instances hundreds of miles away from the nearest landmass, poses a number of different challenges from drilling onshore. With drilling at sea, the sea floor can sometimes be thousands of feet below sea level. Therefore, while with onshore drilling the ground provides a platform from which to drill, at sea an artificial drilling platform must be constructed.

Movable offshore drilling platforms/rigs

There are two types of offshore drilling rings/platforms. The first type is movable offshore drilling rigs that can be moved from one place to another and the second type is the fixed rigs/platforms.

Drilling barges

Drilling barges are used mostly for inland, shallow water drilling. This typically takes place in lakes, swamps, rivers, and canals. Drilling barges are large, floating platforms, which must be towed by tugboat from location to location. Suitable for still, shallow waters, drilling barges are not able to withstand the water movement experienced in large open water situations.

Jackup platforms/rigs

Jackup rigs are similar to drilling barges, with one difference. Once a jackup rig is towed to the drilling site, three or four ‘legs’ are lowered until they rest on the sea bottom. This allows the working platform to rest above the surface of the water, as opposed to a floating barge. However, jackup rigs are suitable only for shallower waters, as extending these legs down too deeply would be impractical. This rig type can only operate to 500 feet in the depth of water. These rigs are typically safer to operate than drilling barges, as their working platform is elevated above the water level.

Submersible platforms/rigs

Submersible rigs, also suitable for shallow water, are like jackup rigs in that they come in contact with the ocean or lake floor. These rigs consist of platforms with two hulls positioned on top of one another. The upper hull contains the living quarters for the crew, as well as the actual drilling platform. The lower hull works much like the outer hull in a submarine – when the platform is being moved from one place to another, the lower hull is filled with air – making the entire rig buoyant. When the rig is positioned over the drill site, the air is let out of the lower hull, and the rig submerges to the sea or lake floor. This type of rig has the advantage of mobility in the water; however, once again its use is limited to shallow water areas.

Semi-submersible platforms/rigs

This is an offshore oil rig that has a floating drill unit that includes columns and pontoons that, if flooded with water, will cause the pontoons to submerge to a depth that is predetermined. Semi-submersible rigs are the most common type of offshore drilling rigs, combining the advantages of submersible rigs with the ability to drill in deep water. Semi-submersible rigs work on the same principle as submersible rigs; through the ‘inflating’ and ‘deflating’ of its lower hull. The rig is partially submerged, but still floats above the drill site. When drilling, the lower hull, filled with water, provides stability to the rig. Semi-submersible rigs are generally held in place by huge anchors, each weighing upwards of ten tons. These anchors, combined with the submerged portion of the rig, ensure that the platform is stable and safe enough to be used in turbulent offshore waters.

Semi-submersible rigs can also be kept in place by the use of dynamic positioning.

Semis-submersible rigs can be used to drill in much deeper water than the rigs mentioned above. Now with a leap in technology, depths of up to 6,000 feet (1,800 m) can be achieved safely and easily. This type of rig platform will drill a hole in the seabed and can be quickly moved to new locations.

Drillships

Drillships are exactly as they sound: ships designed to carry out drilling operations. These boats are specially designed to carry drilling platforms out to deep-sea locations. A typical drillship will have, in addition to all of the equipment normally found on a large ocean ship, a drilling platform and derrick located on the middle of its deck. In addition, drillships contain a hole called a “moonpool”, extending right through the ship down through the hull, which allows for the drill string to extend through the boat, down into the water. This offshore oil rig can drill in very deep waters.

Drillships use ‘dynamic positioning’ systems. Drillships are equipped with electric motors on the underside of the ships hull, capable of propelling the ship in any direction. These motors are integrated into the ships computer system, which uses satellite positioning technology, in conjunction with sensors located on the drilling template, to ensure that the ship is directly above the drill site at all times.

Fixed platforms

In certain instances, in shallow water, it is possible to physically attach a platform to the sea floor. This is what is shown above as a fixed platform rig. The ‘legs’ are constructed of concrete or steel, extending down from the platform, and fixed to the seafloor with piles. With some concrete structures, the weight of the legs and seafloor platform is so great, that they do not have to be physically attached to the seafloor, but instead simply rest on their own mass. There are many possible designs for these fixed, permanent platforms. The main advantages of these types of platforms are their stability; as they are attached to the sea floor, there is limited exposure to movement due to wind and water forces. However, these platforms cannot be used in extremely deep water; it simply is not economical to build legs that long.

 

Template (jacket) platforms

This type of fixed platform is the one usually installed in the Persian Gulf, the Gulf of Mexico, Nigeria, and California shorelines and is made of steel (Sadeghi 1989, 2001). Template platforms mainly consist of jacket, decks and piles.

All of the petroleum platforms installed in the Persian Gulf are of the Template (Jacket) type. At the present time about 145 template platforms belonging to Iran and about 130 template platforms belonging to Arabian countries are installed in the Persian Gulf. Figure 2 shows one template platform.

Compliant Towers (Tower platforms)

Compliant towers are much like fixed platforms. They consist of a narrow tower, attached to a foundation on the seafloor and extending up to the platform. This tower is flexible, as opposed to the relatively rigid legs of a fixed platform. This flexibility allows it to operate in much deeper water, as it can ‘absorb’ much of the pressure exerted on it by the wind and sea. Despite its flexibility, the compliant tower system is strong enough to withstand hurricane conditions.

Seastar platforms

Seastar platforms are like miniature tension leg platforms. The platform consists of a floating rig, much like the semi-submersible type discussed above. A lower hull is filled with water when drilling, which increases the stability of the platform against wind and water movement. In addition to this semi-submersible rig, however, Seastar platforms also incorporate the tension leg system employed in larger platforms. Tension legs are long, hollow tendons that extend from the seafloor to the floating platform. These legs are kept under constant tension, and do not allow for any up or down movement of the platform. However, their flexibility does allow for side-to-side motion, which allows the platform to withstand the force of the ocean and wind, without breaking the legs off. Seastar platforms are typically used for smaller deep-water reservoirs, when it is not economical to build a larger platform. They can operate in water depths of up to 3,500 feet.

Floating production systems

Floating production systems are essentially semi-submersible drilling rigs, as discussed above, except that they contain petroleum production equipment, as well as drilling equipment. Ships can also be used as floating production systems. The platforms can be kept in place through large, heavy anchors, or through the dynamic positioning system used by drillships. With a floating production system, once the drilling has been completed, the wellhead is actually attached to the seafloor, instead of up on the platform.

The extracted petroleum is transported via risers from this wellhead to the production facilities on the semi-submersible platform. These production systems can operate in water depths of up to 6,000 feet.

 

Tension leg platforms

Tension leg platforms are larger versions of the Seastar platform. The long, flexible legs are attached to the seafloor, and run up to the platform itself. As with the Seastar platform, these legs allow for significant side to side movement (up to 20 feet), with little vertical movement. Tension leg platforms can operate as deep as 7,000 feet.

Subsea system

Subsea production systems are wells located on the sea floor, as opposed to at the surface. As in a floating production system, the petroleum is extracted at the seafloor, and then can be ‘tied-back’ to an already existing production platform. The well can be drilled by a moveable rig, and instead of building a production platform for that well, the extracted oil and natural gas can be transported by a riser or even undersea pipeline to a nearby production platform. This allows one strategically placed production platform to service many wells over a reasonably large area. Subsea systems are typically in use at depths of 7,000 feet or more, and do not have the ability to drill, only to extract and transport.

Spar Platforms

Spar platforms are among the largest offshore platforms in use. These huge platforms consist of a large cylinder supporting a typical fixed rig platform. The cylinder however does not extend all the way to the seafloor, but instead is tethered to the bottom by a series of cables and lines. The large cylinder serves to stabilize the platform in the water, and allows for movement to absorb the force of potential hurricanes. The first Spar platform in the Gulf of Mexico was installed in September of 1996. It’s cylinder measured 770 feet long, and was 70 feet in diameter, and the platform operated in 1,930 feet of water depth.

Design of offshore fixed platforms The most commonly used offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, Nigeria, California shorelines and the Persian Gulf are template type platforms made of steel, and used for oil/gas exploration and production (Sadeghi 1989, 2001).

The design and analyses of these offshore structures must be made in accordance with recommendations published by the American Petroleum Institute (API).

The design and analysis of offshore platforms must be done taking into consideration many factors, including the following important parameters:

  • Environmental (initial transportation, and in-place 100-year storm conditions)
  • Soil characteristics
  • Code requirements (e.g. American Institute of Steel Construction “AISC” codes)
  • Intensity level of consequences of failure The entire design, installation, and operation must be approved by the client.

Different analyses needed for template platforms

Different main analyses required for design of a template (jacket) type platform are as follows (Sadeghi 2001):

  • In-place analysis
  • Earthquake analysis
  • Fatigue analysis
  • Impact analysis
  • Temporary analysis
  • Loadout analysis
  • Transportation analysis
  • Appurtenances analysis
  • Lift/Launch analysis
  • Upending analysis
  • Uprighting analysis
  • Unpiled stability analysis
  • Pile and conductor pipe drivability analysis
  • Cathodic protection analysis
  • Transportation analysis
  • Installation analysis.

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Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)

EMERGENCY OVERVIEW

Hydrogen Sulfide(H2S) is a toxic, flammable, colorless, liquefied gas. Hydrogen Sulfide has a distinct “rotten-egg” smell. The odor cannot be relied on as an adequate warning of the presence of Hydrogen Sulfide because at high concentrations olfactory fatigue occurs. Inhalation of high concentrations of this gas can result in unconsciousness, coma, and death. Direct contact with liquid Hydrogen Sulfide can cause frostbite. Hydrogen Sulfide poses an immediate fire hazard when mixed with air. The gas is heavier than air, and may spread long distances. Distant ignition and flashback are possible. Flame or high temperature impinging on a localized area of a cylinder of Hydrogen Sulfide can cause the cylinder to explode without activating the cylinder’s relief devices. Provide adequate fire protection during emergency response situations. Contact with the liquid (or, contact with rapidly expanding gases) may cause frostbite.

ACUTE POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS:

ROUTES OF EXPOSURE:

EYE CONTACT:

Inflammation and irritation of the eyes can occur at very low airborne concentration (less than 10 ppm). Exposure over several hours may result in “gas eyes” or “sore eyes” with symptoms of scratchiness, irritation, tearing and burning. Above 50 ppm, there is an intense tearing, blurring of vision, and pain when looking at light. Exposed individuals may see rings around bright lights. Most symptoms disappear when exposure ceases. However, in serious cases, the eye can be permanently damaged. In addition to irritation, contact of the eyes with the liquid can cause frostbite.

INGESTION:

Ingestion of Hydrogen Sulfide is not a likely route of industrial exposure. INHALATION: Inhalation of high concentrations of Hydrogen Sulfide can cause dizziness, headache, and nausea. Exposure to higher concentrations can result in respiratory arrest, coma, or unconsciousness. Exposure for more than 30 minutes at concentrations of greater than 600 ppm have been fatal. Continuous inhalation of low concentrations may cause olfactory fatigue, so that the odor is no longer an effective warning of the presence of Hydrogen Sulfide. Severe exposures which do not result in death may cause long-term symptoms such as memory loss, paralysis of facial muscles, or nerve tissue damage.

SKIN CONTACT:

The gas may be irritating to the skin. Direct contact with liquid or rapidly expanding gases (which are released under high pressure) may cause frostbite. Symptoms of frostbite include change in skin color to white or grayish-yellow. The pain after contact with liquid can quickly subside.

 

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS OF REPEATED EXPOSURE:

ROUTE OF ENTRY: Inhalation, skin contact

TARGET ORGANS: Respiratory system, skin, central nervous system.

SYMPTOMS: The most significant symptoms of chronic, low level exposure are related to the central nervous system, with potential nerve tissue damage. Repeated low level skin exposure may cause dermatitis.

MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY OVEREXPOSURE: Acute or chronic respiratory conditions or eye disorders may be aggravated by over-exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide.

CARCINOGENICITY: Hydrogen Sulfide is not found on the FEDERAL OSHA Z LIST, NTP, CAL/OSHA, or IARC Carcinogenicity lists.

FIRST AID MEASURES

EYE CONTACT: If liquid is splashed into eyes, or if irritation of the eye develops after exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide, open victim’s eyes while under gentle, lukewarm, running water. Use sufficient force to open eyelids. Have victim “roll” eyes. Minimum flushing is for 15 minutes. Victim must seek immediate medical attention from an ophthalmologist.

INGESTION: Ingestion is an unlikely route of exposure for Hydrogen Sulfide.

INHALATION: Remove victim(s) to fresh air, as quickly as possible. Trained personnel should administer supplemental oxygen and/or cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, if necessary.

SKIN CONTACT: If liquid is spilled on skin, or if irritation of the skin develops after exposure to liquid or gas, immediately begin decontamination with running water. Minimum flushing is for 15 minutes. Remove exposed or contaminated clothing, taking care not to contaminate eyes. Victim must seek immediate medical attention. In case of frostbite, place the frostbitten part in warm water.

DO NOT USE HOT WATER. If warm water is not available, or is impractical to use, wrap the affected parts gently in blankets. Alternatively, if the fingers or hands are frostbitten, place the affected area in the armpit. Encourage victim to gently exercise the affected part while being warmed. Seek immediate medical attention.

NOTES TO PHYSICIANS: Administer oxygen, if necessary and treat symptoms. Be observant for initial signs of pulmonary edema.

FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

FLASH POINT: Flammable gas

AUTO IGNITION: 500 °F (260 °C)

FLAMMABLE RANGE: (LEL): 4.0% (UEL): 44.0%

EXTINGUISHING MEDIA:

Extinguish Hydrogen Sulfide fires by shutting-off the source of the gas. Use water spray to cool fire-exposed containers, structures, and equipment. Other appropriate extinguishing media are dry chemical, foam, and carbon dioxide.

SPECIAL FIRE-FIGHTING PROCEDURES:

Evacuate all personnel from area. If possible without risk, shut off source of gas, then fight fire according to types of materials burning. Extinguish fire only if gas flow can be stopped. This will avoid possible accumulation and re-ignition of a flammable gas mixture. Keep adjacent cylinders cool by spraying with large amounts of water until the fire burns itself out. For small releases, if it is not possible to stop the leak, and it does not endanger personnel, let the fire burn itself out. Incipient fire res-ponders should wear eye protection. Structural fire fighters must wear Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus and full protective equipment, including fire resistant clothing. Large fires should be fought from a distance with an unmanned hose holder or monitor nozzles. If this product is involved in a fire, fire run-off water should be contained to prevent possible environmental damage. If necessary, decontaminate fire-response equipment with soap and water solution.

UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS:

Most cylinders are designed to vent contents when exposed to elevated temperatures. Pressure in a cylinder can build-up due to heat and it may rupture if pressure relief devices should fail to function. An extreme explosion hazard exists in areas in which the gas has been released but the material has not yet ignited.

HAZARDOUS COMBUSTION PRODUCTS: Oxides of sulphur

ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

STEPS TO BE TAKEN IF MATERIAL IS RELEASED OR SPILLED:

Evacuate immediate area. Eliminate any possible sources of ignition, and provide maximum explosion-proof ventilation. Shut off source of leak, if possible. Isolate any leaking cylinder. If leak is from container, pressure relief device or its valve, contact your supplier. If leak is in user’s system, close cylinder valve, safely vent pressure and purge with inert gas before attempting repairs. Protection of all personnel and the area must be maintained. All res-ponders must be adequately protected from exposure. Monitoring should be done for the levels of Hydrogen Sulfide. Colorimetric tubes are available to detect the presence of Hydrogen Sulfide. Levels of Hydrogen Sulfide should be below levels listed in Section 2 (Composition / Information on Ingredients) and the atmosphere must have at least 19.5% oxygen before personnel can be allowed in the area without Self-contained breathing apparatus. Combustible vapor levels must be below 0.4%, which is 10% of the LEL of Hydrogen Sulfide, prior to entry.

HANDLING AND STORAGE

STORAGE: Store cylinders in a well-ventilated, secure area, protected from the weather. Cylinders should be stored up-right with valve outlet seals and valve protection caps in place. Storage should be away from heavily traveled areas and emergency exits. There should be no sources of ignition. All electrical equipment should be explosion-proof in the storage areas. Storage areas must meet National Electrical Codes for Class 1 hazardous areas. Flammable storage areas should be separated from oxygen and other oxidizers by a minimum distance of 20 ft. or by a barrier of non-combustible material at least 5 ft. high, having a fire resistance rating of at least 1/2 hour. Post “No Smoking or Open Flames” signs in the storage and use areas. Do not allow storage temperature to exceed 125 °F (52 °C). Full and empty cylinders should be segregated. Use a first-in, first-out inventory system to prevent full containers from being stored for long periods of time. Consideration should be taken to install leak detection and alarm equipment for storage areas.

HANDLING: Do not drag, roll, slide or drop cylinder. Use a suitable hand truck designed for cylinder movement. Never attempt to lift a cylinder by its cap. Secure cylinders at all times while in use. Use a pressure reducing regulator to safely discharge product from cylinder. Use a check valve to prevent reverse flow into cylinder. Never apply flame or localized heat directly to any part of the cylinder. Once cylinder has been connected to properly purged and inerted process, open cylinder valve slowly and carefully. If user experiences any difficulty operating cylinder valve, discontinue use and contact supplier. Never insert an object (e.g., wrench, screwdriver, etc.) into valve cap openings. Doing so may damage valve, causing a leak to occur. Use an adjustable strap-wrench to remove over-tight or rusted caps. All piped systems and associated equipment must be grounded. Electrical equipment should be non-sparking or explosion-proof.

SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS: Be aware of any signs of dizziness or fatigue; exposures to fatal concentrations of Hydrogen Sulfide could occur without any significant warning symptoms. All work operations should be monitored in such a way that emergency personnel can be immediately contacted in the event of a release. All work practices should minimize the release of Hydrogen Sulfide

Always store and handle compressed gas cylinders in accordance with Compressed Gas Association, Inc. (telephone 703-412-0900) pamphlet CGA P-1, Safe Handling of Compressed Gases in Containers. Local regulations may require specific equipment for storage and use.

EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION

ENGINEERING CONTROLS:

VENTILATION: Hydrogen Sulfide detectors should be installed in or near areas where Hydrogen Sulfide is being used or stored. If appropriate, install automatic monitoring equipment to detect the level of oxygen and the presence of potentially explosive air-gas mixtures. Because of the high hazard associated with Hydrogen Sulfide, stringent control measures such as a gas cabinet enclosure or isolation may be necessary. Provide natural or explosion-proof ventilation adequate to ensure Hydrogen Sulfide does not reach exposure limits listed in Section 2. (Composition / Information on Ingredients). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred, because it prevents gas dispersion into the work place by eliminating it at its source.

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION:

Maintain exposure levels of Hydrogen Sulfide below the levels listed in Section 2 (Composition / Information on Ingredients). Use supplied air respiratory protection if Hydrogen Sulfide levels exceed exposure limits or during emergency response to a release of this product. If respiratory protection is required, follow the requirements of the Federal OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134), or equivalent State standards. The following NIOSH respiratory protection recommendations are for Hydrogen Sulfide. Up to 100 ppm – Powered air purifying respirator with cartridge(s) to protect against hydrogen sulfide; or gas mask with canister to protect against hydrogen sulfide; or SAR; or full-face piece SCBA.

Emergency Use: Emergency or Planned Entry into Unknown Concentration or IDLH Conditions: Positive pressure, full-face piece SCBA; or positive pressure, full-face piece SAR with an auxiliary positive pressure SCBA. Gas mask with canister to protect against hydrogen sulfide; or escape-type SCBA. The IDLH concentration for Hydrogen Sulfide is 100 ppm. High concentrations may be within the flammable range and must not be entered.

EYE PROTECTION: Safety glasses. Additionally, face-shields should be worn if there is a potential for contact with liquid Hydrogen Sulfide. Eye wash stations/safety showers should be near areas where Hydrogen Sulfide is used or stored.

SKIN PROTECTION: Work gloves are recommended when handling cylinders of Hydrogen Sulfide. Use thermally insulated gloves when working with containers of Liquid Hydrogen Sulfide. Wear chemically-resistant gloves when using this gas. Butyl rubber, chlorinated polyethylene, neoprene nitrile, and polyvinyl rubber are recommended. Use fire-resistant gloves and clothing in emergency situations. Use double gloves for spill response.

OTHER PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: Use body protection appropriate for task. Static-resistant clothing is recommended. Safety shoes are recommended when handling cylinders. Transfer of large quantities under pressure may require use of fire retardant and/or chemically impervious clothing.

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

APPEARANCE, ODOR AND STATE: Colorless gas. The liquid is also colorless. The odor for both the liquid and gas is similar to that of “rotten eggs”.

MOLECULAR WEIGHT: 34.08 BOILING POINT (1 atm): -76.4 °F (-60.2 °C)

SPECIFIC GRAVITY (also called vapor density) (air = 1): 1.189

SPECIFIC GRAVITY (of liquid) (At 59 °F (15 °C)): 0.79

FREEZING/MELTING POINT: -117.2 °F (-82.9 °C)

VAPOR PRESSURE (At 70 F (21.1 C): 248.9 psig

GAS DENSITY (At 68 F (20 C) and 1 atm): 0.088 lb/ft3

SOLUBILITY IN WATER (At 68 F (20 C): 0.317 lb/gal

STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

CHEMICAL STABILITY: Stable CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Cylinders should not be exposed to temperatures in excess of 125 °F (52 °C). INCOMPATIBILITY (Materials to Avoid): Hydrogen Sulfide is a strong reducing agent and is highly reactive. Hydrogen Sulfide is not compatible with the following materials: oxidizing agents, organic peroxides, alkaline materials, metals (i.e. copper, lead), and metal oxides. Hydrogen Sulfide is corrosive to most metals, because it reacts with these substances to form metal sulfides.

 

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Assembly Area Safety Rules

Assembly Area Safety Rules

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Assembly Area Safety Rules. The company expects workers to follow its safety rules. By signing, you will be held responsible for following these safety rules. Disciplinary action could result when these safety rules are not followed. These safety rules are for your safety only. Please use these safety rules on the job site to keep yourself and others safe.
•Employees must wear their seat belts when driving on company business.
•Report to work free from the aftereffects of drugs or alcohol.
•Report maintenance needs or hazards before the end of your work shift.
•Report incidents or injuries before the end of your work shift.
•Horseplay is prohibited.
•Do not climb on racking or shelving.
•Keep emergency eyewash stations clear.
•Keep fire exits clear, unblocked and unlocked.
•Fire exit and emergency lighting should be lit and battery backups should function.
•Keep fire extinguishers and fire alarm pull stations clear.
•Do not bypass safety devices on hand or power tools.
•Wear eye protection to protect your eyes from flying objects.
•Wear hearing protection when exposed to loud machines or noise.
•Clean up spills of liquid and water.
•Do not run.
•Straighten floor runners or rugs that could trip fellow employees.
•Keep desk chairs and desk drawers pushed in when not in use.
•Know severe weather shelter locations within the building.
•To reach items use a proper foot stool or ladder and never stand on chairs or desks.
•Get help to team lift heavy objects like supplies, components or tools.
•Operate forklifts only if you are trained and authorized.
•Wear your seat belt when operating forklifts.
•Report security concerns, door locks or security system components that don’t function.
•Wear proper footwear on the job and during winter weather.
•Scan for trip hazards in the parking lot.

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AMPUTATIONS IN THE WORKPLACE

AMPUTATIONS IN THE WORKPLACE

AMPUTATIONS IN THE WORKPLACE

sources of amputations in the workplace?Amputations are some of the most serious and debilitating workplace injuries. They are widespread and involve a variety of activities and equipment. Amputations occur most often when workers operate unguarded or inadequately safeguarded mechanical power presses, power press brakes, powered and non-powered conveyors, printing presses, roll-forming and roll bending machines, food slicers, meat grinders, meat-cutting band saws, drill presses, and milling machines as well as shears, grinders, and slitters. These injuries also happen during materials handling activities and when using forklifts and doors as well as trash compactors and powered and non-powered hand tools. Besides normal operation, the following activities involving stationary machines also expose workers to potential amputation hazards: settingup, threading, preparing, adjusting, cleaning, lubricating, and maintaining machines as well as clearing jams.

 What types of machine components are hazardous?

The following types of mechanical components present amputation hazards:

Point of operation—the area of a machine where it performs work on material.

Power-transmission apparatuses—flywheels, pulleys, belts, chains, couplings, spindles, cams, and gears in addition to connecting rods and other machine components that transmit energy.

Other moving parts—machine components that move during machine operation such as reciprocating, rotating, and transverse moving parts as well as auxiliary machine parts.

What kinds of mechanical motion are hazardous?

All mechanical motion is potentially hazardous. In addition to in-running nip points (“pinch points”)—which occur when two parts move together and at least one moves in a rotary or circular motion that gears, rollers, belt drives, and pulleys generate—the following are the most common types of hazardous mechanical motion:

Rotating—circular movement of couplings, cams, clutches, flywheels, and spindles as well as shaft ends and rotating collars that may grip clothing or otherwise force a body part into a dangerous location.

Reciprocating—back-and-forth or up-and down action that may strike or entrap a worker between a moving part and a fixed object.

Transversing—movement in a straight, continuous line that may strike or catch a worker in a pinch or shear point created between the moving part and a fixed object.

Cutting—action generated during sawing, boring, drilling, milling, slicing, and slitting.

Punching—motion resulting when a machine moves a slide (ram) to stamp or blank metal or other material.

Shearing—movement of a powered slide or knife during metal trimming or shearing.

Bending—action occurring when power is applied to a slide to draw or form metal or other materials.

What can employers do to help protect workers from amputations?

You should be able to recognize, identify, manage, and control amputation hazards commonly found in the workplace such as those caused by mechanical components of machinery, the mechanical motion that occurs in or near these components, and the activities that workers perform during mechanical operation. Work practices, employee training, and administrative controls can help prevent and control amputation hazards. Machine safeguarding with the following equipment is the best way to control amputations caused by stationary machinery:

Guards provide physical barriers that prevent access to hazardous areas. They should be secure and strong, and workers should not be able to bypass, remove, or tamper with them. Guards should not obstruct the operator’s view or prevent employees from working.

Devices help prevent contact with points of operation and may replace or supplement guards. Devices can interrupt the normal cycle of the machine when the operator’s hands are at the point of operation, prevent the operator from reaching into the point of operation, or withdraw the operator’s hands if they approach the point of operation when the machine cycles. They must allow safe lubrication and maintenance and not create hazards or interfere with normal machine operation. In addition, they should be secure, tamperresistant, and durable.

You are responsible for safeguarding machines and should consider this need when purchasing machinery. New machinery is usually available with safeguards installed by the manufacturer. You can also purchase appropriate safeguards separately or build them in-house.

Are certain jobs particularly hazardous for some employees?

Yes. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Secretary of Labor has designated certain nonfarm jobs as especially hazardous for employees under the age of 18. These workers generally are prohibited from operating band saws, circular saws, guillotine shears, punching and shearing machines, meatpacking or meat-processing machines, paper products machines, woodworking machines, metal-forming machines, and meat slicers.

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Trips, Slips and Falls

2048 px x 858 px b

Trips, Slips and Falls

Problem:

People fall by tripping over some object

such as a tool on the floor, stairs or walkways.

Solution:

To remedy this situation it is necessary that all places where people walk be kept clear of such tripping hazards. Employees must not leave tools or materials in places where  they or others can trip over them. Work areas should be designed and arranged to eliminate pipe, conduit, supports, etc., at the floor level. Tools and other equipment should be placed in their proper storage areas when not being used.

Problem:

People fall by stumbling into holes in the floor or over uneven floors caused by loose boards, cracked concrete, etc.

Solution:

The obvious remedy for this situation is to keep floors in good condition and to repair defects as they occur. The actual prevention job may require the elimination of the causes of worn floors, such as steel wheeled carts and hand trucks, excessive vibration of machines, or too heavy loading of the floor for the type of construction.

 

Tripping and Stumbling Hazards

Objects out of place

Objects or materials in walkways

Tools on the floor

Projecting parts of machines or equipment

Equipment or material on stairs

Scrap or waste materials

Pipe or conduit set near floor level

Extension cords, power cables, air hoses, welding cables,

fuel, gas and oxygen hoses

Uneven floor surface:

Holes and depressions in floor or other walkway

Projections—warped or loose boards or blocks

Broken floor surface

Uneven patches

Uncovered drains, pits

Bent floor boards or plates

Loose or poorly fitted grating

Sudden changes in pitch or elevation

Sagging or expanded floor supports

 

Problem: People fall by slipping on floors, stairs, etc. which are wet from water, oil or chemicals.

Solution: If it is unavoidable for the floor to be wet, the flooring should be of nonslip type, or the employees should wear shoes with nonskid soles, or both. If the floors are normally dry, water spillage should be cleaned up immediately. Spilled oil, grease or chemicals should be removed at once and the source of the spill checked and corrected.

Slipping Hazards

Wet floors, stairs, walkways:

Water

Oil or grease

Chemicals

Smooth floors, stairs, walkways:

Waxed, polished surface

Metal plate or cover

Tile, terrazzo, marble

 

Problem: People not seeing where they are stepping. This may be caused by poorly lighted areas; by carrying or pushing loads that are so large as to obstruct the view; or by being distracted and not paying attention to where they are going.

Solution:

Observation and recognition of these hazards by supervisors or other workers should be reported to the proper authority immediately. Supervisors have the additional special responsibilities with regard to safety in the workplace of encouraging safe work habits and correcting unsafe ones, explaining to the workers all the potential hazards associated with their work areas and being responsive to employee requests for action or information regarding possible hazards in the workplace.

 

Problem:

People fall because of faulty stairs or handrails. Narrow, unevenly spaced, broken treads or stairs that are too steep present conditions that are unnatural. Broken, improperly set or lack of handrails can result in falls that could have been prevented.

Solution:

People learn to walk on standard stairs and get into the habit of stepping a certain distance. Any variation of the stair is liable to cause a misstep. Be sure that fixed industrial stairs are installed: with a minimum width of 22 inches; with angles to the horizontal of between 30 and 50 degrees (See Table D-1); with treads that are reasonably slip resistant; with rise height and tread width that is uniform throughout the flight of stairs; designed and constructed to carry a load at least five times the anticipated weight; with a minimum vertical clearance of seven feet; and with standard railings provided and installed in accordance with §1910.23 and 1910.24.

 

Problem: People fall from high places.

Solution:

Walkways, tramways, scaffolds and piles are hazardous unless proper safeguards and safe work methods are used. Use the proper personal protective equipment for the situation. Be sure to check over all equipment before use to ensure it is in good condition. Keep all areas clean: no scrap, loose tools or tangled lines. Follow manufacturer’s instructions to the letter on all equipment.

 

Table D-1

Angle to horizontal          Rise               Tread run

                                         (in inches)         (in inches)

30°35′ …………………………..61/2……………11

32°08′ …………………………..63/4 …………..103/4

33°41′ …………………………..7 ……………..101/2

35°16′ …………………………..71/4 …………..101/4

36°52′ …………………………..71/2 …………..10

38°29′ …………………………..73/4……………93/4

40°08′ …………………………..8..…………….91/2

41°44′ …………………………..81/4……………91/4

43°22′ …………………………..81/2……………9

45°00′ …………………………..83/4……………83/4

46°38′ …………………………..9………………81/2

48°16′ …………………………..91/4……………81/4

49°54′ …………………………..91/2……………8

 

Problem: People fall because of unsafe ladders. Ladders may be unsafe because of their construction, condition or use.

Solution: It is necessary that ladders be inspected carefully at regular periods to detect and correct any structural defects or unsafe conditions, such as sharp edges, splinters or burrs. Training should be provided concerning safety-related work practices relating to ladders, and employees should be required to use the safe practices.

Safety Check List

  • Are floors, stairs and walkways clear and free from tools, materials, oil, grease, water or chemicals?
  • Are the floors and walkways smooth and free from holes, cracks and loose boards?
  • Where the operation requires the floor to be wet frequently, is the floor surface rough-finished concrete or some other nonslip type?
  • Are the employees encouraged to wear shoes with nonskid soles in potentially wet or slippery areas?
  • Are the walkways and work areas arranged so as to avoid tripping hazards at floor level?
  • Are barricades and warning signs used where unavoidable tripping hazards are present?
  • Have the workers been trained to replace items, such as tools, immediately after use?
  • Are walkways, stairs, ramps and work areas adequately lighted?
  • Are the stairs in good condition and provided with handrails?
  • Are the risers on stairs of equal height?
  • Are the treads of stairs smooth and free from holes, cracks and excess wear?
  • Are ladders in good condition, free from cracks, burrs and splinters?
  • Are all ladders inspected regularly by a competent person?
  • Are all elevated walkways, tramways, catwalks and scaffolds provided with toeboards, handrails, and intermediate railings?
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